Nov. 17, 2020

02 - Olympic Trials Marathoner's Recovery Routine - Austin O'Brien

02 - Olympic Trials Marathoner's Recovery Routine - Austin O'Brien

Olympic Trials Marathoner's Recovery Routine - Austin O'Brien

Summary:

Austin O'Brien didn't see his elite level of success until after college in two thousand sixteen, he got the idea to try and qualify for the Olympic trials marathon and in 2020, that dream became a reality when he competed in the Olympic trials this February after qualifying in November in 2019. Austin has been running 100+ miles per week for months on end, and he takes his recovery routine very seriously. We talk about how he fits his recovery into his busy schedule, sleep and one more unique practice he does as part of his recovery routine that is unique to him.

 

(transcript below)

 

Austin O'Brien's Information:

email: austin@mentallystrongconsulting.com

twitter: https://twitter.com/aob_33

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/aob_33/

 

Jase Kraft's Information:

Instagram: https://instagram.com/jaecheese

Website: https://scienceofsportsrecovery.com

Email: jase@scienceofsportsrecovery.com

 

Transcript:

 

Jase Kraft: [00:00:00] Austin O'Brien didn't see his elite level of success until after college in two thousand sixteen, he got the idea to try and qualify for the Olympic trials marathon and in 2020, that dream became a reality when he competed in the Olympic trials this February after qualifying in November in 2019. Austin has been running one hundred plus miles per week for months on end, and he takes his recovery routine very seriously. We talk about how he fits his recovery into his busy schedule, sleep and one more unique practice. He does a part of his recovery routine that is unique to him. So let's get into it.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:00:53] You're listening to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast. Each week, we explore how to recover more efficiently from training so you can work out harder and realize your full potential. This is the Science of Sports Recovery podcast.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:21] Hey, Austin, it's great to have you on the show.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:01:24] Thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:26] Yeah, well, I know our listeners are excited to get into your recover routine being one hundred miles a week running. That's very impressive. But before we get started, I want to put out a fun fact, because sometimes it's hard to compare apples to apples, to apples to oranges in the sport world.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:48] So for those of you that don't know, according to run, repeat that, Austin, just making the marathon trials, the Olympic trials, puts him in the top point, zero six percent of all marathon runners. And in comparison to football, that would be like a high school senior graduating high school. Playing football has a point zero nine percent chance of making it to the NFL. So, Austin, you if you are a football player, you would essentially be good enough to be in the NFL. So you are definitely in elite company. And I just wanted to put that out there because that makes a little bit more sense to people, so. Like many elite athletes who start young. When was that for, for you, when did you start running?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:02:44] Yeah, well, so my mom was always a runner growing up, so it was always just something I saw her do. But I actually initially went out for cross-country when I was in middle school, seventh grade, I was I started to really develop a love for basketball and I was totally obsessed. So my thought in seventh grade was, hey, I don't really care so much about football, so why don't I go for cross-country and get really get really fit, get in shape for basketball season, because that's my main sport right now it. Lo and behold, I started running really well, running fast, got better every single race and ended up winning the state cross-country meet in seventh grade. And it just kind of stuck that I ended up being a lot better at running than I was at basketball.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:03:33] Yeah, so with when you said, hey, I'm going to go out for cross-country, did you prepare for that season at all or was it just kind of like show up on day one, not knowing what to expect?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:03:45] I mean, like I said, my mom ran, so I kind of knew a little bit about what she was doing. And I would go on, like little two mile runs with her. But honestly, all of my aerobic fitness was just playing basketball for six to eight hours a day, running up the court. So, yeah, in terms of like what you would normally do for a workout in a cross-country practice, it was totally new.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:07] Yeah. OK, and then just to be clear, that state me that was seventh and eighth graders or was that just seventh graders?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:15] It was a separate division. So that was seventh graders. Seventh graders.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:19] Cool, cool and where you grow up? 

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:23] The eastern side of Iowa. I went to Pleasant Valley High School, and that's in a town called Bettendorf Cities.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:32] How big is that?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:35] My school had about a thousand students. We were, we were a 4a school, which is the largest class in Iowa. But we are probably one of the smaller schools in that division.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:45] OK,

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:46] So my graduating class is around 250.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:49] All right. So you found cross country in seventh grade, I would imagine. Then you started doing track then as well and. Did you continue on with basketball where I mean, were you doing a sport through high school and everything?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:05:06] Yeah, I was doing cross-country basketball and track for the longest time, I think of it. It was after my sophomore year that I, I stopped with the basketball. But, you know, I was I've been five nine since eighth grade and it hasn't changed.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:05:23] So I saw the writing on the wall a little bit. I just decided to fall into cross country and track my junior year.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:05:32] Ok, so is that when you would say, like you were you're hooked on running, or did you know before then that you were like running? It's going to be my thing. I'm just going to wait out basketball until I can.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:05:47] Yeah, that's a good question. And actually, it's kind of funny, I, I really didn't care for running at all. I, I really despise it for the longest time. And I think what brought me back was just the competition, the competition of it, and I was I was finding success competing against people at a pretty high level. So I was going to some of those AU and USA track and field national needs and getting top three finishes. So, I mean, I was finding myself competing at a very high level in middle school and I think I just got addicted to the competition aspect of it. That part was really fun for me, but it took a long time before I could honestly say I'm starting to love running. Yeah, and that probably didn't happen until college, honestly.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:37] Ok, so are you running year round in high school or is it just seasonal?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:06:44] Yeah, so it was mostly seasonal.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:06:46] I mean, I would always run a little bit, but before I while I was still doing basketball so we would have our summer cross-country prep period just easy running miles, no structured practice or anything, and then cross country season, obviously ramp up the training and then basketball. I would just kind of run casually outside of basketball practice whenever I wanted to, but I guess it ended up being year round. Naturally, when you do cross country and track, it does get pretty close like that. But there was a natural braking period in between each season.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:18] Ok, OK. Cool, so you went to college, you ran for with Central Park, right. How did that go? How is the transitioning from high school to college for you.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:07:35] Yeah, so it was interesting, I, I was more of a middle distance runner at that point, so I got into Central College, a small D3 school in Pella, Iowa, and I was running a lot of eight hundred and fifteen hundred meter races and I started to see some success there.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:07:54] But I wouldn't say that the elite level performances I was doing at like the middle school age group that had kind of stalled out, I saw glimmers of it in high school, especially my senior year. Yeah, but, you know, I was just running pretty good for, like a Division three school in our conference, but I wasn't really competing on a national level until my senior year. I, I started getting really good at some of the distance events. I actually lost a significant amount of weight to to help with that and ramped up the training volume. And then all of a sudden I found myself competing nationally again and cross-country and then again in in the mile and 5k distances on the track.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:37] So what was that volume ramp up from? Your junior and senior year?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:08:45] Yeah, I was probably running, I would guess, when I got to Central is probably about 60 miles a week. And then it maybe it got into the 70s a little bit in the 80s during my junior year and then my senior year, I definitely had a few more weeks, but it was more more long term consistency in the 80s.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:09:05] Ok. OK, so you said you are competing nationally, then what what kind of meets places, times where you running and college?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:09:18] Yeah, so it was. There was a few races where we would go and run against some of those really competitive Minnesota and Wisconsin schools who traditionally had a ton of all Americans and occasionally they would have like the individual national champion. So I remember there was one race we went to in lacrosse and there was a there was a guy that I really wanted to beat in the 8k and I beat him that day running twenty four, forty eight, I believe, for 8k on a pretty flat and fast course. And he was very good at that point. But then he actually ended up being a national champion before he graduated. He was a year younger than me, but that was, that was probably one of the turning points for me. And I was like, OK, I can compete at this level. This are, I'm beating some, some really high caliber runners here.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:10:13] Yeah. And for those that don't an 8k is a five mile race. So and he says twenty four, forty eight, that's a five minute pace for five miles there. So. So then after Central.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:10:26] I know, I know I actually have a personal connection with you because we raced against each other when you were at Mankato for grad school. So I guess first of all, it's blackout. What were you, what were you studying at Central? And then what was your grad school program?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:10:45] Yeah. So at Central I was studying health and exercise science and I had a few options with that. But I've always been fascinated by how the mind works with with athletic performance. And I started looking for graduate programs. And that's where I, I got into Minnesota State, Mankato, into their sports psychology grad program. And that's what I studied for the two years while I was there. And since I studied abroad in my time at Central, I actually had an extra season of track eligibility to use. And that's where I got to compete against you and get dusted by you in the last hundred meters of a conference meet.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:11:23] That was, I want to say, dusted by any means.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:11:30] If we can find a photo of that, I'll stick it in the show notes because it is one of the most epic finishes with three guys in less than a tenth of a second apart, really straining for the finish there. So so what what kind of mile times where you're running in Central and Mankato?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:11:53] Yeah. So my, my pr in the mile and still my pr the mile was fourteen point eight or nine, something like that. And I actually ran that at the division three national meet in twenty fourteen. And that, that got me the last all-American spot that year. I think I was, I was probably fit enough that year to run in the four seven-ish. But it's kind of hard to find opportunities where you get a race that takes you out fast. In Division three I ran my four ten. We actually our first half of the race was about two a later two or nine. So this is a pretty tough close to to bring in.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:35] Yeah, cool.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:36] Ok, so then through your college career, did you have any injuries or any I mean, what was especially with runners, is a lot of overuse and injuries. Is there any thing that was particular that stood out for you?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:12:55] Nothing, really. I've been really fortunate on the injuries, obviously, I'll occasionally get some little nicks and pains that kind of go away if you take care of them. But I've never really had any significant like I need to stop running for three months type of injuries. There have been times where I've had like sore Achilles or plantar fasciitis, random foot pains or, or leg pains that caused me to have to change my plan a little bit in training. I do remember at Central in my undergrad I had and that's when the barefoot running thing was. It was a really big thing and, and there was a lot of mixed evidence on that. So I'm not encouraging people to, to try barefoot running. But I what I did do was I went from being a big heel striker to running more on the four foot. And I started to notice that I had a lot less knee pain and I was kind of nursing an injury in my ankle that just it was not like something that stopped me from running again, but it was more just a constant nagging pain. And that went away when I switched to more of a four foot strike. So I thought that was interesting.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:14:14] Ok, cool.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:14:18] Yeah. So you've been pretty healthy. And I know in our prior conversation you said one of your strengths is your durability. And I'm sure a lot of that has to do with your recovery routine, which will go over here in a second. But I'll take it. OK, so we've kind of gone through your college career after that. When was it? That Austin said I might be able to make the 2020 Olympic marathon trials.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:14:48] Yeah. So my, my second year in grad school, I actually wasn't really running very much. I took this would have been in a way 2015, I took a significant amount of time off from running and when 2016 rolled around, it's an Olympic year and that's kind of when everyone gets excited and starts running really fast and I start seeing guys that I competed against in college when I was at Central, not necessarily qualifying for the Olympics, but they were going for some of those Olympic trials. Time's coming really close. And that's that's when I just got really excited and like, man, well, if they can do it. What's stopping me? And so I started training again. And it was it was a really rough start. After taking significant amount of time off, I think it was about four or five months. And it took a long time to to get back to where I was, obviously. But once I started going with it, I kind of had my eyes set on 2020, and I had this it was totally unrealistic at the time. And I just I wanted to qualify for the Olympic trials and something. And I think at that point I would have preferred it to be like the 5k or the 10k on the track. Yeah. And of course, that's still a dream of mine, if I can find an opportunity and and if I'm fit enough. But the what I notice is that those times just keep getting faster and faster and those races are more and more competitive.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:16:19] And it's very hard to get into those into those races and even into the to the qualifiers. It's hard to even make a meet get into a knee where you can run that kind of time. Yeah. So I started to look toward the marathon and the marathon standard was breaking two hours and 19 minutes, which is about five eighteen pace to get a spot in the Olympic trials and. Of course, it's not an easy feat to do, but in my mind, it sounded more feasible for my ability level than, say, a thirteen twenty five K. So I started training for that and ramped up the volume and just kind of had some hit or miss success for a number of years. And then finally in late twenty eighteen I, there's kind of a friend of mine started working with Tom Schwartz, a guy who coaches can mentally pretty well-known coach in the field, and he went from being a good runner to being, you know, one of the best in the country. He actually broke it off and he actually ended up winning the national marathon championship in twenty eighteen. So after kind of seeing his trajectory, I was sold on working with with Tom. So I reached out and started that relationship in twenty eighteen and started to see some significant improvement in the marathon world.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:17:41] Yeah. Wow. OK, so you said you ramped up volume. What kind of volume. What are you doing now as far as miles per week?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:17:50] Now I'm kind of stagnant. I would say probably been ninety or one o five for the last six, seven months. But when I was experimenting before working with my coach, I mean, there were times I would try holding like one ten, one twenty for a while. Yeah, there's just some when you're when you're coaching yourself, it's it's hard to be objective. So you don't really do the workouts that you need to improve or just something in your training system isn't balanced. Right to...

Transcript

Jase Kraft: [00:00:00] Austin O'Brien didn't see his elite level of success until after college in two thousand sixteen, he got the idea to try and qualify for the Olympic trials marathon and in 2020, that dream became a reality when he competed in the Olympic trials this February after qualifying in November in 2019. Austin has been running one hundred plus miles per week for months on end, and he takes his recovery routine very seriously. We talk about how he fits his recovery into his busy schedule, sleep and one more unique practice. He does a part of his recovery routine that is unique to him. So let's get into it.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:00:53] You're listening to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast. Each week, we explore how to recover more efficiently from training so you can work out harder and realize your full potential. This is the Science of Sports Recovery podcast.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:21] Hey, Austin, it's great to have you on the show.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:01:24] Thanks for having me. I'm excited to be here.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:26] Yeah, well, I know our listeners are excited to get into your recover routine being one hundred miles a week running. That's very impressive. But before we get started, I want to put out a fun fact, because sometimes it's hard to compare apples to apples, to apples to oranges in the sport world.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:48] So for those of you that don't know, according to run, repeat that, Austin, just making the marathon trials, the Olympic trials, puts him in the top point, zero six percent of all marathon runners. And in comparison to football, that would be like a high school senior graduating high school. Playing football has a point zero nine percent chance of making it to the NFL. So, Austin, you if you are a football player, you would essentially be good enough to be in the NFL. So you are definitely in elite company. And I just wanted to put that out there because that makes a little bit more sense to people, so. Like many elite athletes who start young. When was that for, for you, when did you start running?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:02:44] Yeah, well, so my mom was always a runner growing up, so it was always just something I saw her do. But I actually initially went out for cross-country when I was in middle school, seventh grade, I was I started to really develop a love for basketball and I was totally obsessed. So my thought in seventh grade was, hey, I don't really care so much about football, so why don't I go for cross-country and get really get really fit, get in shape for basketball season, because that's my main sport right now it. Lo and behold, I started running really well, running fast, got better every single race and ended up winning the state cross-country meet in seventh grade. And it just kind of stuck that I ended up being a lot better at running than I was at basketball.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:03:33] Yeah, so with when you said, hey, I'm going to go out for cross-country, did you prepare for that season at all or was it just kind of like show up on day one, not knowing what to expect?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:03:45] I mean, like I said, my mom ran, so I kind of knew a little bit about what she was doing. And I would go on, like little two mile runs with her. But honestly, all of my aerobic fitness was just playing basketball for six to eight hours a day, running up the court. So, yeah, in terms of like what you would normally do for a workout in a cross-country practice, it was totally new.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:07] Yeah. OK, and then just to be clear, that state me that was seventh and eighth graders or was that just seventh graders?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:15] It was a separate division. So that was seventh graders. Seventh graders.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:19] Cool, cool and where you grow up? 

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:23] The eastern side of Iowa. I went to Pleasant Valley High School, and that's in a town called Bettendorf Cities.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:32] How big is that?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:35] My school had about a thousand students. We were, we were a 4a school, which is the largest class in Iowa. But we are probably one of the smaller schools in that division.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:45] OK,

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:04:46] So my graduating class is around 250.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:49] All right. So you found cross country in seventh grade, I would imagine. Then you started doing track then as well and. Did you continue on with basketball where I mean, were you doing a sport through high school and everything?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:05:06] Yeah, I was doing cross-country basketball and track for the longest time, I think of it. It was after my sophomore year that I, I stopped with the basketball. But, you know, I was I've been five nine since eighth grade and it hasn't changed.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:05:23] So I saw the writing on the wall a little bit. I just decided to fall into cross country and track my junior year.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:05:32] Ok, so is that when you would say, like you were you're hooked on running, or did you know before then that you were like running? It's going to be my thing. I'm just going to wait out basketball until I can.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:05:47] Yeah, that's a good question. And actually, it's kind of funny, I, I really didn't care for running at all. I, I really despise it for the longest time. And I think what brought me back was just the competition, the competition of it, and I was I was finding success competing against people at a pretty high level. So I was going to some of those AU and USA track and field national needs and getting top three finishes. So, I mean, I was finding myself competing at a very high level in middle school and I think I just got addicted to the competition aspect of it. That part was really fun for me, but it took a long time before I could honestly say I'm starting to love running. Yeah, and that probably didn't happen until college, honestly.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:37] Ok, so are you running year round in high school or is it just seasonal?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:06:44] Yeah, so it was mostly seasonal.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:06:46] I mean, I would always run a little bit, but before I while I was still doing basketball so we would have our summer cross-country prep period just easy running miles, no structured practice or anything, and then cross country season, obviously ramp up the training and then basketball. I would just kind of run casually outside of basketball practice whenever I wanted to, but I guess it ended up being year round. Naturally, when you do cross country and track, it does get pretty close like that. But there was a natural braking period in between each season.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:18] Ok, OK. Cool, so you went to college, you ran for with Central Park, right. How did that go? How is the transitioning from high school to college for you.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:07:35] Yeah, so it was interesting, I, I was more of a middle distance runner at that point, so I got into Central College, a small D3 school in Pella, Iowa, and I was running a lot of eight hundred and fifteen hundred meter races and I started to see some success there.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:07:54] But I wouldn't say that the elite level performances I was doing at like the middle school age group that had kind of stalled out, I saw glimmers of it in high school, especially my senior year. Yeah, but, you know, I was just running pretty good for, like a Division three school in our conference, but I wasn't really competing on a national level until my senior year. I, I started getting really good at some of the distance events. I actually lost a significant amount of weight to to help with that and ramped up the training volume. And then all of a sudden I found myself competing nationally again and cross-country and then again in in the mile and 5k distances on the track.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:37] So what was that volume ramp up from? Your junior and senior year?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:08:45] Yeah, I was probably running, I would guess, when I got to Central is probably about 60 miles a week. And then it maybe it got into the 70s a little bit in the 80s during my junior year and then my senior year, I definitely had a few more weeks, but it was more more long term consistency in the 80s.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:09:05] Ok. OK, so you said you are competing nationally, then what what kind of meets places, times where you running and college?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:09:18] Yeah, so it was. There was a few races where we would go and run against some of those really competitive Minnesota and Wisconsin schools who traditionally had a ton of all Americans and occasionally they would have like the individual national champion. So I remember there was one race we went to in lacrosse and there was a there was a guy that I really wanted to beat in the 8k and I beat him that day running twenty four, forty eight, I believe, for 8k on a pretty flat and fast course. And he was very good at that point. But then he actually ended up being a national champion before he graduated. He was a year younger than me, but that was, that was probably one of the turning points for me. And I was like, OK, I can compete at this level. This are, I'm beating some, some really high caliber runners here.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:10:13] Yeah. And for those that don't an 8k is a five mile race. So and he says twenty four, forty eight, that's a five minute pace for five miles there. So. So then after Central.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:10:26] I know, I know I actually have a personal connection with you because we raced against each other when you were at Mankato for grad school. So I guess first of all, it's blackout. What were you, what were you studying at Central? And then what was your grad school program?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:10:45] Yeah. So at Central I was studying health and exercise science and I had a few options with that. But I've always been fascinated by how the mind works with with athletic performance. And I started looking for graduate programs. And that's where I, I got into Minnesota State, Mankato, into their sports psychology grad program. And that's what I studied for the two years while I was there. And since I studied abroad in my time at Central, I actually had an extra season of track eligibility to use. And that's where I got to compete against you and get dusted by you in the last hundred meters of a conference meet.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:11:23] That was, I want to say, dusted by any means.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:11:30] If we can find a photo of that, I'll stick it in the show notes because it is one of the most epic finishes with three guys in less than a tenth of a second apart, really straining for the finish there. So so what what kind of mile times where you're running in Central and Mankato?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:11:53] Yeah. So my, my pr in the mile and still my pr the mile was fourteen point eight or nine, something like that. And I actually ran that at the division three national meet in twenty fourteen. And that, that got me the last all-American spot that year. I think I was, I was probably fit enough that year to run in the four seven-ish. But it's kind of hard to find opportunities where you get a race that takes you out fast. In Division three I ran my four ten. We actually our first half of the race was about two a later two or nine. So this is a pretty tough close to to bring in.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:35] Yeah, cool.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:36] Ok, so then through your college career, did you have any injuries or any I mean, what was especially with runners, is a lot of overuse and injuries. Is there any thing that was particular that stood out for you?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:12:55] Nothing, really. I've been really fortunate on the injuries, obviously, I'll occasionally get some little nicks and pains that kind of go away if you take care of them. But I've never really had any significant like I need to stop running for three months type of injuries. There have been times where I've had like sore Achilles or plantar fasciitis, random foot pains or, or leg pains that caused me to have to change my plan a little bit in training. I do remember at Central in my undergrad I had and that's when the barefoot running thing was. It was a really big thing and, and there was a lot of mixed evidence on that. So I'm not encouraging people to, to try barefoot running. But I what I did do was I went from being a big heel striker to running more on the four foot. And I started to notice that I had a lot less knee pain and I was kind of nursing an injury in my ankle that just it was not like something that stopped me from running again, but it was more just a constant nagging pain. And that went away when I switched to more of a four foot strike. So I thought that was interesting.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:14:14] Ok, cool.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:14:18] You've been pretty healthy, and I know in our prior conversation you said one of your strengths is your durability. And I'm sure a lot of that has to do with your recovery routine, which will go over here in a second. But I'll take it. Ok, so we've kind of gone through your college career after that. When was it? That Austin said I might be able to make the 2020 Olympic marathon trials.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:14:48] Yeah. So my, my second year in grad school, I actually wasn't really running very much. I took this would have been in a way 2015, I took a significant amount of time off from running, and when 2016 rolled around, it's an Olympic year, and that's kind of when everyone gets excited and starts running really fast and I start seeing guys that I competed against in college when I was at Central, not necessarily qualifying for the Olympics, but they were going for some of those Olympic trials. Time's coming really close. And that's, that's when I just got really excited, and like, man, well, if they can do it. What's stopping me? And so I started training again. And it was it was a really rough start. after taking significant amount of time off, I think it was about four or five months. And it took a long time to to get back to where I was, obviously, but once I started going with it, I kind of had my eyes set on 2020, and I had this it was totally unrealistic at the time. And I just I wanted to qualify for the Olympic trials and something. And I think at that point I would have preferred it to be like the 5k or the 10k on the track. Yeah. And of course, that's still a dream of mine, if I can find an opportunity and and if I'm fit enough. But the what I notice is that those times just keep getting faster, and faster, and those races are more and more competitive.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:16:19] And it's very hard to get into those into those races and even into the to the qualifiers. It's hard to even make a meet get into a knee where you can run that kind of time. Yeah. So I started to look toward the marathon and the marathon standard was breaking two hours and 19 minutes, which is about five eighteen pace to get a spot in the Olympic trials, and ofcourse, it's not an easy feat to do, but in my mind, it sounded more feasible for my ability level than, say, a thirteen twenty five K. So I started training for that and ramped up the volume and just kind of had some hit or miss success for a number of years. And then finally in late twenty eighteen I, there's kind of a friend of mine started working with Tom Schwartz, a guy who coaches can mentally pretty well-known coach in the field, and he went from being a good runner to being, you know, one of the best in the country. He actually broke it off and he actually ended up winning the national marathon championship in twenty eighteen. So after kind of seeing his trajectory, I was sold on working with with Tom. So I reached out and started that relationship in twenty eighteen and started to see some significant improvement in the marathon world.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:17:41] Yeah. Wow. OK, so you said you ramped up volume. What kind of volume. What are you doing now as far as miles per week?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:17:50] Now I'm kind of stagnant. I would say probably been ninety or one o five for the last six, seven months. But when I was experimenting before working with my coach, I mean, there were times I would try holding like one ten, one twenty for a while. Yeah, there's just some when you're when you're coaching yourself, it's, it's hard to be objective. So you don't really do the workouts that you need to improve or just something in your training system isn't balanced. Right to where you can actually see improvement. So I definitely burned myself out a little bit.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:18:24] Yeah, but that just the sheer volume or way, I mean with the burnout type of it, or was there anything mental to that with training partners or not having a coach.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:18:40] You know, I think it was I'm doing all this work and I'm not improving.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:18:45] You know, I got to after starting training again after grad school, I started to have some pretty decent races. I had an akpr on the roads and I ran about twenty four, twenty five and a fast race in Chicago. And after that, I really didn't see a whole lot of improvement, despite putting in a lot of work and. That causes a certain level of frustration, as I'm sure a lot of people can relate to and eventually when I saw a guy who was going, well, he's coached multiple guys, Tom Heads, who have gone from being very good runners to very, very good runners. And, you know, he's helped them see more improvement. So I jumped on that train and it's definitely helping so far.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:19:32] Yeah. So. And how long you've been working with Tom, you said.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:19:39] I think we started in November of twenty eighteen.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:19:44] Ok, and then about a year later is when you ran your qualifying mark for the trials.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:19:50] Yep. And it.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:19:53] Go ahead.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:19:53] It wasn't the it wasn't the prettiest of buildups some, we actually ran. I did a Houston marathon in twenty nineteen, so that's a January race. That was my first marathon and my thought going into that was I'm just very few people running a very good debut marathon. So I wasn't expecting much. And, you know, I was just going to go into it and see what the marathon was like because of qualifying for the 2020 trials and now it's early twenty eighteen. I better get on it. Right. So I got in that first one, but as the as the time got closer to it, I was starting to feel really fit off of Tom's new training system for me and. I started to have these thoughts of like, well, shoot, you know, maybe I should just go for it, maybe I should start going after the five 18 pace way and see what happens.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:20:46] And wow, that that's that was a big blow up.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:20:52] I think I made it through. About eight miles of that pace, and it wasn't hard at that point, but I just had that thought of like, wow, there was a lot of miles left and it wasn't going to happen that day. So I started slowing down that day and ended up running two thirty one on the debut and had a very rough last 10 miles or so. But we kept going. We then we got into Grandma's marathon, which was in June of twenty nineteen, built up for that. Definitely a new level of fitness and got it, ran to twenty two there, so is significantly better went out at the 218 paces again and lasted longer but then made a decision about halfway through. It's like, well, do I risk a big blow up again or do I salvage do I start slowing down a little bit and salvage, you know, a big pr. And I'm glad I did because I feel a lot better about two twenty two than two thirty one. And then after that it, you know, you start to think you're you're halfway through the year, realistically, you only have one more really, really good shot at taking the qualifier because and for those of you who don't run marathons, it takes a lot of time to build up for one and it takes a lot of time to recover from one.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:22:16] So I started eyeing some fall marathons and monumental marathon in Indianapolis, ended up being the choice for the usual draw a pretty competitive fields and it's a very flat course. So I ended up going out to that one and and had an interesting build up to that. Actually had some probably in my worst race of my entire life in the build up to that race and. So to tell that story. I was training all throughout and usually in a marathon build up, I like to find different types of races to stay sharp. So some 5k's, some 10k's. So this particular race was a 10 mile in September. And I was training wasn't going great. And I went into it. It was a hot day. Yeah. I just I just ran so poorly, I thought, OK, we lost the heat and not feeling great. I should still be there. I'm fifty three, fifty four minutes. Right. Because fifty three flat is the pace to qualify for in the marathon. So surely I should be able to do that for ten miles at this point and.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:23:25] I ran fifty seven something. Oh, man, it was rough. It was a time where my high school self would have crushed me, you know, and I was so broken after that race is like, what is going on? This is so this is unacceptable. And finally, I investigated a little bit, got some testing and found out I was anemic and very iron deficient and, you know, talk to my coach about it. And they started, you know, adjusting the training a little bit as needed to to get those answers back up, obviously taking iron supplement. And once once those numbers got back up, it didn't take long. And finally. A few weeks before the race, literally two weeks before the race, I finally had a glimmer of hope running a fast road 5K and then running a solid tempo at the marathon pace. And that's that was the first time that I was like, OK, I'm I'm fit enough for this is actually a possibility. In November last year and a monumental marathon, I had a really good day, really strong pack of guys going for the time standard and it all worked out so.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:24:36] And what place did you place in that race?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:24:40] I think it was six or seven. I don't remember exactly what place. I just I just remember that we went through 20 miles and I had about a 30 second cushion on the standard that I needed to run. And I was still feeling pretty good at that point. So in my mind, I was like, OK, I just I got it. I just need to cross the finish line to work with a few other guys in the race to battle some strong headwinds around mile twenty three. And we got to the line together. And at that point I was like, I don't even care who, you know, who beat you here because we're all going to Atlanta.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:25:14] Yeah.Awesome. So you talked about being anemic back then, it's actually pretty common for endurance athletes. What while we're looking back on it now, what were some signs that you maybe could have picked up on before actually having that race that you felt like the world was ending.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:25:39] Yeah, that's that's a really good question. And looking back, I mean, now that I have been diligent about iron supplement and iron consumption, like I I'm seeing a lot more improvement from my training. I think an early sign would be there's many things that could cause this, but I think one thing that looking back is like, Ok, I've hired a great coach who's given me a great training plan and I'm getting worse. You know what's this doesn't make any sense. So I think that would have been an early sign for me. And I think this is something that I had been dealing with for a number of years just because we don't have iron in your blood. One of the adaptations to training is building more red blood cells and getting stronger that way. But if you don't have iron, your body's not going to do that. You're not going to adapt to the training that you're doing.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:26:32] Sure, yeah, Ok. And as we know, training is really about recovery, and adapting to the training, not necessarily the training itself. So we're going to dive into your recovery routine now.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:26:49] And obviously working with Tom, you've been at ninety to one hundred and five miles a week.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:26:58] That's a ton of mileage right around for 14 or 14 to 18 a day or something like that on average. Obviously, you don't do that everyday.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:27:09] But what on earth are you doing after your workouts to be this consistent for this long?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:27:19] So I want you to start with thinking about maybe like one of your tougher workouts, explain what that is, and then we'll get into, like, what do you first do to recover from that?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:27:31] Yeah, that's a good question. So there's a number of of tough workouts that I do, and I wouldn't say it's any one recovery secret that really does it for me. It's a combination of things, but given, a given training week, I would say is kind of like the block, so I wouldn't call it one hard workout. But you can guarantee usually that like Tuesdays and Fridays are tough sessions where I'm you know, one day I'm probably running about 3k or 5k pace for pretty good given amount of time. And then another day, you can probably guarantee that I'm running about 10k pace, or thresholds, or which would be like your one hour race pace for a given period of time, both followed by some faster running either hill sprints or fast sprints. Yeah. So pretty, pretty intense sessions. And then Sundays usually always a long run day, where I'm getting anywhere from 19 to twenty two miles, so, The I think the biggest thing that I do in a given week of training that helps recover from that is, is that taking the easy days super slow. I've never been one to hammer the easy runs, but before I started working with Tom, I was probably running a little faster than I needed to. And I really dial them back pretty significantly, and when you talk about recovering from a workout, you stress one day on a Tuesday or a Friday. So on a Wednesday or Saturday, I'm running really slow to recover from that workout, to recover from that stress and get ready for the next stress.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:29:17] So as an elite marathoner, I guess what what is your recovery pace? Just so if somebody is a runner, they can say, ok, if I'm doing that, I'm probably running too fast for my recovery.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:29:29] Yeah. So it kind of depends on what I mean, I'm mostly a morning runner, so. Yeah. When I when I start at six or seven a.m., nothing really works, right? So, you know, that first mile, it could be anywhere from seven fifty to eight, thirty, depending on how tired I am. And then I'll kind of naturally get into a flow of seven paces on a typical recovery run day and some days get a little faster. But I'm never breaking seven on Wednesday and Saturday. That's like a guarantee.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:30:02] Yeah, I think when I asked coach how fast I should do my recovery runs and he basically just said no faster than your 5K race pace plus two minutes a mile. So I'm well above that even.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:30:17] Yeah. So I mean at the end of the day it sounds like you're not even focused on the pace, you're just kind of running what your your body wants to and how, how that feels, whether it be morning or afternoon, you know, it's kind of what dictates it.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:30:34] Absolutely. I'm really big on what is the purpose of the training session that you're about to get into. And I think it's super important for athletes of any sport to really dial into that. What are you trying to get out of this session? And for me, on Wednesdays and Saturdays, it's to recover from yesterday. So, yeah, you know, it's all about it really doesn't matter how fast I run, it's just am I doing what I need to do to recover from yesterday, and prepare for the next hard effort.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:31:07] Yeah, sure. So besides actually running, or you know what other modes of recovery, the practice?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:31:17] Yeah. So I think there's there's a few that I think I'll highlight, one of which being nutrition. And I'm not nutrition expert, so I won't I'm sure you'll have some of those on the show and I won't go into that too. Too much in-depth. But I really focus on when I get down with my morning runs, I really focus on getting a good amount of carbohydrates. And I think a lot of runners and athletes in general probably don't consume enough of the carbs to our carbs are bad culture for whatever reason. And so I really focus on that and just getting something in within a good half hour or so after I'm done running. But probably the three biggest things that I do on a very regular basis. So I do I have a one of those percussion massage devices that I bought a couple of years ago, the hypervolt I don't know if you've heard of that one. There's a there's a few devices like it around right now, but it's something that I have used probably two or three times a day since I've got it. So I've totally got my money's worth out of it. But one thing I'll do a lot, I'll do this every day, and I usually just kind of do it in the afternoon when I have a little downtime. I'll do this hypervolt massager, you know, all over my lower legs and all over my body. And then I will go straight into the foam roller. And I don't know if there is anything scientific about it. But in my mind, the massage device that I use the beginning kind of gets my legs more receptive to the deep tissue massage. The foam roll, it would give me. So between those two, that's that's probably about twenty minutes of. Active recovery that I do every single day and I have been very disciplined about doing that during this time of running all the miles.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:33:13] Yeah. How do you stay? Like how do you remember to do that every day, do the same time of the day or?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:33:22] Not really, if I have a good down period at work, it could be over a lunch break or if I have a 20 minute down period at 3:00 p.m., I'll do it then. Sometimes if I have to do it at like six o'clock at night. That's fine, too. I just make sure that I get it in. I'm not strict about time. Like if I if I create a series of tasks that I want to get done with running or with anything, I don't put like times that need to be done. I'll just list them and just know that, like, today this needs to be done. So I the foam rolling and the recovery team is definitely part of that.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:33:57] Ok, so and I know you do something else that's kind of unique as well. But before we get to that, I want to ask you, how much sleep are you getting?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:34:08] That's a great question and the answer is not enough.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:34:14] I think I've seen a lot of things where athletes need to be getting like eight to 12 hours of sleep. And, you know, I work a full time job like everyone else. That's not always feasible. Most nights I'm probably in the seven to eight range, so I probably do better than most people in my position, unfortunately, with this covid period where I get to work from home. Know, I've been pretty fortunate about finding a good 30 minute nap in the middle of the day over like a lunch break. And I think that's helped pretty significantly, too.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:34:44] So been a, have a masters in sport psych, correct? I know we are talking before, you do some meditation as part of your just kind of your day to day routine. But that obviously has an impact on recovery as well. And first of all, I just kind of tell it's like what what does that meditation, when do you do it? And what does that kind of entail? Because I know in meditation, when you say to somebody, it can mean a million different things to everybody.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:35:26] Right. And there are a number of ways to meditate. And I'll just keep it simple. Like what I do. I do this first thing in the morning when I wake up. So I'm usually up around five, five, thirty a.m. and the first thing that I do is a 12 minute mindfulness meditation. So all I do this is all kind of find a comfortable spot to sit either in a chair or on a couch or something like that. And I'll just close my eyes and focus on my breath. So I'll be really if you really want to just follow your breath, through your nose, down through the inhale, connecting with your diaphragm and then back up and out through your nose, and you want to follow that as closely as you can. And what happens during this time period is that all these different thoughts come around, you know, things that you need to accomplish, thoughts about the past, different ideas. All these things happen while you're meditating. And your objective is to acknowledge these things that they're nonjudgmental. Right. You're just aware of of what's happening around you. And then you just refocus your attention on your breath. So no matter what you get distracted by, you constantly refocus your attention on your breath and I'll do this every morning for 5 to 12 minutes at a given time. OK.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:36:57] Okay. Is this something that you started before sport psych kind of interest, or is that you've been doing all through high school, too?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:37:06] Yeah, so that's that's actually something that I learned while I was at Mankato and I started studying. Sports psychology is starting to become more popular in the field of sports psychology. But the more and more you read the literature about meditation, there are so many more benefits to it. Right? There's I've seen things where in the neuropsychology behind it, after you practice it for eight weeks, we actually start to change structures in your brain that improve your emotion, your memory, your attention span. So we're talking about things that are not just related to sport, but just positive for everyday life, but from the sport context. You know, when you're when you're racing, you're trying to hold your attention, hold your focus for a long period of time, and I think running is unique in that way. Other sports, like football, for example, you're giving a high, intense period of focus for 10 to 20 second play. And then you take a break and you do it again over and over again. So in sport, the better that you can hold your attention on on the task that you're doing and the present moment, the better you're going to perform. And that's really what meditation teaches, right? You're focused on your breath in the present moment and you acknowledge the distraction that comes by and you come back to your breath.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:38:33] Yeah, that's good, yeah, any any endurance sport or you're it's like a sustained effort. I mean, being an endurance athlete myself, I run into this where I start thinking about the finish and what happens if I had this time or where I really need to just focus on, ok, I'm three miles into the race, like, how much more can I give now, you know, instead of.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:39:00] And yeah, that's good meditation, so I know you also help other people with this kind of stuff, or, or, or, tell us a little bit more about your kind of day job, because it's it's unique to sport performance as well.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:39:18] Yeah. So I am a mental performance consultant and I work with athletes both in a team capacity. So I'm working with a number of teams over Zoom even, and then also some individual athletes as well, helping develop skills like confidence, focus, motivation and stress management. And, you know, we we focus a lot on the applications to sport performance first. But I'm also a big fan that these are skills that are applicable in anything that we do in school, your relationships, career. So I think there's a lot of value to it in multiple areas of your life.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:39:59] Yeah. So what, what types of athletes are you working with? Just runners or outside of that too.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:40:06] I work with athletes of all levels.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:40:09] I can relate best obviously to the, to the individual sports, the endurance athletes. So I do tend to work with a lot of runners.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:40:17] Ok, so what what's the difference when you're working with endurance athlete, like a runner or somebody else? Do you teach them different things or how do you navigate that with, you know, obviously you are a basketball player back in the day, but how do you navigate that with not actually being in their sport?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:40:41] That's a really good question. The skills are the same. I will say that. But the way that they're applied are different. And that's what makes makes doing this so much fun is because not only are the skills different for not only other skills applied differently for every sport, but they're also applied differently for every athlete. So in the one on one setting with an athlete, that's where I can really work with them to customize, for example, a pre-performance routine. So what what do they do? What's their checklist before they get to a race or to a basketball game or before a tennis match? Right. So it's about getting their mind ready for that specific event and. I think it's just you have to be aware of the context of the different sports, kind of for example, what I mentioned earlier with cross country is more of a sustained activity where you have to be you have to navigate through different types of focus for 15 or 18 minutes, whatever that is for you. Yeah, but whereas running or whereas football is more just like a burst of focus, right? Yeah. I mean, you you can do something in between each player to kind of bring yourself back to the present moment and get ready for the next play.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:41:59] Yeah. So if you had an overarching like, This is the most common thing that people struggle with when it comes to preparing the mind for the competition or the practice. What would you say that is?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:42:24] I would say what I'm seeing now, and this might be unique to runners, but I think it applies to a bunch of other sports, too, is kind of the pre competition nerves and an understanding that. They happen for a reason right there on some level, you need to experience this nervousness or distress before competition. It's a good thing that helps you bring, bring the best performance out of yourself so that it's a different experience than a typical practice or hard workout day, right, and then in really just working with them to help develop strategies where if it is overbearing, how how do they dial it back a little bit so they can enter best performance down.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:43:09] Ok, yeah. So just dealing with the free competition, there's now how I did that and you can tell me maybe this is a way out of line, but I was like I would just tell myself instead of saying I'm nervous, I'd say I'm excited because then it would be like, OK, I'm getting ready for it. And nervousness has this connotation like something bad might happen or excitement's like I'm 100 percent ready. How would you say that mental prep was?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:43:45] That is actually a fantastic strategy called reframing. So you were able to take something that might be perceived as a threatening situation but changed your perspective of it to something positive. And I think that's a very positive thing to do. And kind of going off how you did that. Jared Ward, who's a, who's a marathon Olympian in twenty sixteen for the US, he I saw him say something once that was really intriguing to me. He actually called the term before race. He's nervouscited right, nervous and excited, he just blended together, and call it nervouscited, and I just thought it was one of the most incredible things I've seen because it's so true. It's a combination of all of it. And on some level, if you're not nervous for an event, that, that might impact your performance a little bit.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:44:41] So, yeah, you want a little bit of adrenaline, but not so much an imperative. Absolutely.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:44:49] So before we get into the, the last part, while we're on the subject, if somebody is like, hey, I want to find out more about the mental coach thing, how where can they find you, and talk to you about that?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:45:05] Yeah, you can find me on Instagram or Twitter. My handles are aob underscore three three. You can also email me at Austin@mentallystrongconsulting.com

 

Jase Kraft: [00:45:21] Ok, and I'll have links to them. So if you're working out now or if you're driving somewhere that you can find that in the, in the show notes and they'll be there so you can reach out to him more on that topic.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:45:35] So we are needing to wrap up here, but I just got three quick questions for you. One, if there was a recovery tool, meaning something besides just going out there and running, that, that's the only tool you could have for the rest of your life or career.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:45:56] What would that be?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:45:58] That's really tough, if it were financially feasible, I would have a traveling sport massage therapist, but no, I would have to go with the the percussion massage or the hypervolt that I have.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:46:12] You can take it everywhere. There's different attachments. You can put on it at different spots. But that's what I would go with.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:46:18] And you said you use the brand,the hypervolt?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:46:21] Hyperice is the brand. Hypervolt is the is the actual device.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:46:26] Ok, I'll put a link into show notes for that too.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:46:30] So the second question, your, your purpose for doing your sport, why are you at the end of the day, why do you run?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:46:40] Yeah, I think that's twofold. My, my personal and selfish reason. I, I just recently kind of started to see my potential in this sport and where it could go. And you know, now that I've kind of got my iron figured out, I'm starting to see some rapid improvement in fitness levels. And it's easy to get excited when when you see things improving for you. So I know that I've got a lot more potential to hit with this sport. And I'm just excited and, and I love pursuing it every day. But there's also this other side of it where if I can do it, other people can do it, too. And if you're passionate about it, you love what you do and you're consistent about it. You can absolutely hit your potential in any sport endeavor that you do. And I think that's, that's really powerful.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:47:27] And Austin just gave you the roadmap passion, consistent and love, and then you'll be successful.

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:47:36] Just the biggest thing that you see in your word. Again, I'll quote him. But a lot of other people say this, too. They just say keep showing up. And I think that's very accurate to what I've done over the last few years. I just keep showing up every day. I do the work that's prescribed by my coach, and I'm starting to see improvements. So I just keep showing it also.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:48:01] And lastly, what is your biggest asset for success?

 

[00:48:10] Yeah, we talked about my durability, I think naturally I am very good at staving off injury, and I'm sure that's a combination of my, my body structure and the recovery routines that I do. But I would, I would have to say my durability, because I can be very consistent at a high training volume for a long period of time. And that's, that's where I'm going to see improvement.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:48:33] Yeah. Awesome. Awesome. Well, there you have it. The very best advice from a marathoner, Austin O'Brien. So if you like to check him out on social channels, again, that is AOB underscore three three on both Instagram and Twitter?

 

Austin O’Brien: [00:48:51] Correct.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:48:52] And if you like what you heard, you can also email him and I'll have that his email in the show notes. And lastly, if this episode brought you learning, if it inspired you, don't be selfish. Share it with a teammate. Share it with a competitor maybe. Or just give them half of the show for the competitor so you can still beat them. But let's help everybody stay injury-free and we'll see you next time.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:49:27] All right, episode's over.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:49:28] If you found value in this episode, please consider giving us a review on iTunes and if you haven't already yet, subscribe do so now. So you don't miss any important topics in the coming week. If you have any questions or suggestions for the show, please send them my way. I am most responsive on Instagram.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:49:48] That's @jaecheese Or email me directly at Jase@scienceofsportsrecovery.com. Talk soon.

 

Austin O'Brien

Olympic Trials Marathoner & Sport Psychologist

Austin O’Brien didn’t see elite-level success until after college. In 2016 he got the idea to try and qualify for the Olympic Marathon Trials. In 2020 that dream became a reality when he competed in the Olympic Trial this February after qualifying in November of 2019. Austin has been running 100+ miles per week for months on end and takes his recovery routine very seriously.