Nov. 17, 2020

03 - Using Data to explain your Recovery - Justin Roethlingshoefer

03 - Using Data to explain your Recovery - Justin Roethlingshoefer

Using Data to explain your Recovery

Summary:

Justin Roethlingshoefer is the founder of the Hockey Summit and all inclusive training camp for professional hockey players. And this camp utilizes the same techniques from his book Intent. His born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and now resides in New York City. Justin is a coach and author, a speaker, and I would add a little bit of a data nerd to the mix and he will attest to that. Justin is all about recovery for max performance and takes a unique stance on monitoring recovery. We chat about recovery data points, what you should start tracking and what you should stop tracking, as well as the five stages of burnout and much more.

 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer:

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/justinroeth/

LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/justin-roethlingshoefer-7252a766/

 

Jase Kraft's Information:

Instagram: https://instagram.com/jaecheese

Website: https://scienceofsportsrecovery.com

Email: jase@scienceofsportsrecovery.com

 

Notable Links:

Whoop- https://glnk.io/mo28/justin-roethlingshoefer

 

Transcript

 

Jase Kraft: [00:00:00] Welcome to the Sports Recovery podcast, we have a great guest on the show today with a bachelor's degree in movement science and master's degree in exercise physiology Justin Roethlingshoefer is the founder of the Hockey Summit and all inclusive training camp for professional hockey players. And this camp utilizes the same techniques from his book Intent. His born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and now resides in New York City. Justin is a coach and author, a speaker, and I would add a little bit of a data nerd to the mix and he will attest to that. Justin is all about recovery for max performance and takes a unique stance on monitoring recovery. We chat about recovery data points, what you should start tracking and what you should stop tracking, as well as the five stages of burnout and much more.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:02] No further ado. Let's get into.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:08] You're listening to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast. Each week, we explore how to recover more efficiently from training so you can work out harder and realize your full potential. This is the Science of Sports Recovery podcast.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:36] Hey, Justin, great to have you on the podcast.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:01:39] It's awesome to be here, just thank you so much for having me on. It's awesome to be involved with people pushing the performance sector forward. And you're doing an awesome job. So thanks so much for having me.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:50] Yeah, no problem.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:51] So that we got a little bit of background on you on the intro, but that's more of the what you do. I like to kind of get in the mind of why you came into this space. So what about recovery and kind of the data behind it or even before we go there? I mean, what about strength and conditioning led you to where you are now?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:02:15] Yeah, for sure. So it it all started in my playing career. It was never the biggest guy, was never the strongest guy. It's never the fastest, most talented. But what allowed me to play at the level that I did and and get as far as I did and in college and my first pro contract and everything else in hockey was simply that I helped people and was able to be coached from the age of about 16 by some very great performance coaches. And they helped me fall in love with the strength and conditioning side of things. And in the science that went into it and just figuring out how I could pull out every last ounce of potential that I had, even though I wasn't, again, the most God gifted, talented player out there.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:03:06] Yeah. Cool,so you're in the pros and then obviously now you're doing more of the coaching, the how how long was your career in and the pros and what led you to the coaching side of it.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:03:17] I was just a cup of coffee and in the pros I went from my senior year signed year contract and from there we went right into the coaching space. I had an affinity for raising my sophomore year of college. I just knew that this was a space I wanted to be on my way up through the ranks to. I had a lot of high quality, great coaches that helped inspire me to want to help give back to other players. And so that's kind of where I led. And I always use myself as a guinea pig. Rachmat has guys always thought I was weird for hooking up myself to heart rate monitor. And when I was sleeping there, then when I was on the ice to hold my stuff, to put them on the GPS tracker to my fingers, look at lactate levels and all of this stuff, you know what? I can pull out every last potential myself. And as I started to do that, obviously guys like you, they try to me as we seem to do things differently, going to again, I feel so much better than I ever have in my life. And so even as a player going through my last year, my junior year of college in the NCAA, I was kind of acting as a player coach anyways. Yeah, with the with the experiments I was doing and kind of seeing where we could test the waters and kind of get that last little bit of performance.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:48] So. So what what was the weirdest thing you did for recovery that everybody was like, man, that's never going to work.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:04:58] I mean, it's not that they said it would never work.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:05:01] And the weirdest thing was I would actually like pee in the cup and take a look at the ketone, issue of hydration and, and everything was really going from the ice to the weight room and to help identify how much I needed to get back in. And one of the other issues were these two things. I was just I was just fascinated by it. I was absolutely, at the other thing. It was weird, is it? Guys always thought I was I would sleep with heart rate monitor and my roommate was just like, what are you doing, had roommate on the baseball team, Another one,

 

Jase Kraft: [00:05:40] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:05:42] hockey, and they just they just could not wrap your head around it. But as in a place where I am today, I guess that's all is I always knew you were weird man. Has it paid off and.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:05:54] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:05:55] Yeah I will do the same again because I'm a nerd that way. Said at the beginning, I love numbers, I love data, I love figuring out ways in which we can optimize the human experience. Yeah. From both the way you perform covers and ultimately show up mentally on a day in and day out.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:13] Yeah I can attest to the heart rate monitor. You get some weird looks.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:19] I wear a heart monitor when I run and you know, in the hot summer you're running without a shirt on and it's strapped right around a chest wear, a bra would go in.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:32] You get people yelling at you through the windows just random things, but. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:06:38] One year or so on that point is in the Florida summers. It's obviously the heat melting down on you.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:06:47] And we we were trying to the train station for hours upon hours, and this was coming back on you as this would have been two thousand, thirteen, fourteen. And so you have a tenma.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:03] And that tenma I goes across your back from the strap.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:08] And so I went back to the team and we were doing weighings first day of training camp. And I take my shirt off and I'm walking away from something.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:19] What did you do on Summer?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:26] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:26] It was just kind of a running joke in there. Jerry Bra, where there a brasier on this stuff.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:34] So, yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:38] That that's that was the pitfalls of science advancement, I guess.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:44] Yeah. Yeah. You're on experiment at the cost of your own reputation or whatever. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:52] Be the butt about the jokes.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:55] Yeah. The butt of jokes. One of my teammates in college, Nick Lawson, if he's listening, shout out to him. But we had a contest one summer who could get the best heart rate monitor tan line. So. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:09] Who won that one?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:10] He did because he he was dedicated enough to go to the beach and while he was just lounging around here and where his heart rate monitor so he could beat me. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:25] Cheated a little bit.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:26] Yeah. So but anyways, we're here to talk more about tan lines, so let's get into the you know, obviously you're a data nerd when it comes to recovery.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:41] So over the years, what have you been like tracking and what are some things that you've tracked before that are useful again to what are kind of your main staples now?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:54] Yeah, absolutely. It's a great question.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:56] So there's so much data about everything from GPS to heart rate to blood pressure, to HRB, to respiration rate.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:09:06] You can go down a rabbit hole very big and between twenty 16, twenty eighteen. I went down there to the point where I was counting the coalition, the number of explosions, a game of hockey.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:09:21] The players were taking out the number of stops and starts to change directions to the average speed first before I started actually pouring over into the real world with entrepreneurs and executives. However, what you start to find is this is that you get older and dated with that. And if you look at a survey like anything, we can skew it. You can tell a story. We can tell a story with the data so that it to the point that you're looking for, it proves the point the way that you wanted to go. And that's so different because we you have so many data points that are maybe slightly correlated with our factory worker correlation coefficient.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:10:07] It doesn't matter to a certain extent if you have fifty pieces of data that you're looking at because the math turns very convoluted very quickly. And for a regular Joe or even a pro athlete, I will ask you to I'm willing to say that you cannot create perfection. You can't. Life is unpredictable. Sport is unpredictable, for that matter. Everything is unpredictable except for how you're showing up every single day. And so we had to narrow it down to some of the best ones. What I started to find really quickly was when you're going out to a place or you're going to play a hockey game or you're going into a meeting with your biggest investors, you're not going in saying, oh, I'm going to pull back a little bit so that I can be better for tomorrow or I'm going to go in and give it ninety three percent of my back to know you're going in and you're going to win.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:11:03] If you're a high performing individual, if you want to show up and you're successful and no matter what it is you're doing, you're going to win every single day. You're not going for a tie. You are going to play for the loss, you're going to win. And so that is where all bars should be left alone. Go in and do what you do and where the focus should actually be placed is in the recovery of the athlete, the recovery of the individual, the recovery of the person. And that's how you can optimize performance. It's not about being in the moment in your race. You had no. Go, go play. We've had twenty three other hours in the day or five other days in the week that we were able to prepare you for the moment that you're going in for. And that's the mentality change that I've had to get. A lot of my athletes out of my corporate clients heads around is it's not just showing up the day of the game and going and playing or you hear the old a lo of people used to talk about cartload going to cartload the night before I go run a big race. Well, that's the best way to actually have your worst performance the night before. And in all of these things that we traditionally thought we could just do the night before or the day of, and we'd be good to go or monitor ourselves in inrun or in the event it's a whole lead up to it. And how are we optimizing ourselves and what our objectives are looking at? So it really became not so much about the actual event itself, but the recovery aspect. And that is where you can make the biggest gains in the performance industry.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:42] Yeah, you bring up a good point of last data during the actual performance is better.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:50] I know from my experience, my best races, I don't wear a watch. I wasn't looking at the time.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:57] I was all about what my body was doing, how I perceived what it was doing and where the competitors were, you know, and eventually I just like stopped what my body was doing. Just ran for the competition. Yeah. And I and I see this and, you know, basketball players, I would imagine the hockey players or maybe the first quarter period they're going they had a lot of running to do and then they're like, oh, I'm spent, you know, but they're not focused on the now instead of the past is like, what more can you give right now in your sport, in your boardroom? You're meeting your employees rather than thinking about what's coming and what's behind you?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:13:47]  If you know being present and knowing how you can drive forward and you bring up a good point.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:13:52] One of my a couple of my players would always say this is Justin where am I today, where am I today? And used to say just go play. They forget about where you just go play.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:14:05] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:14:05] Because guess what? Our head coach is going to be looking at us and with ten minutes left of the game done by one, do you think he's going to be keeping best players off the ice?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:14:14] Not a chance, do you think coming into this season of if you're an executive and you're presenting and it's the biggest presentation that you have, but you have to get it done that you're not going to push a little bit harder to cross that line and to get it done well?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:14:30] Well, of course you are. It's a no brainer. Why are we going to limit you or hold you back? If I want you to empty the tank, I want you to go over the level that you think you're going to go, because guess what? The moment that you've completed, I am going to work with you. I'm going to teach you how to recover super maxillary so that you can come back even better than what you just did. You are surpassing barriers and that's performance. It's going completely backwards. We focus so much on the performance. So the physical work that's being done in the weight room, in the on the field of performance, I hear this all the time from the executive point. Where should I get my heart rate when I'm going through my runs? Where should I get my heart rate when I'm doing my boot camp classes?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:15:22] Where should I get my heart rate when I'm in my spin class on my telephone and it's like work to a maximum effort to find one number and that one number is strain, I want to know if that's all I want to know is where is your strain number at? We're completed where we at and then from there that that helps us figure out what we're going to do for the rest of the day. Yeah. How much are we going to recover?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:15:46] How much sleep are we going to get? What is our routine like? What is our nighttime routine with our sleep hygiene look like? What are we doing from a supplementation standpoint? What are we doing from the morning routine standpoint?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:15:57] What do we doing from a nutritional standpoint? We increasing calories. We decreasing calories at that point for a lot of people don't matter either. It just becomes a matter of habit in terms of portion sizes and making sure we're getting the proper amount of portions of it. It becomes so simple that it's one step after the next, after the next, and it literally becomes iterative and we start to learn the processes in which maximize performance.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:16:23] Yeah. So you talked, you know, the one big metric is strain And I would imagine there's different metrics that you track on the recovery side like how much sleep and quality and that kind of stuff, but what goes into the strain metric?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:16:44] Yeah, that's great. Great, great question.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:16:46] So strain is a metric and survived by heart rate of heart rate and the time timestep. And once we're able to understand the time, total time spent in certain heart rates with certain movement because we're tracking all the twenty four...

Transcript

Jase Kraft: [00:00:00] Welcome to the Sports Recovery podcast, we have a great guest on the show today with a bachelor's degree in movement science and master's degree in exercise physiology Justin Roethlingshoefer is the founder of the Hockey Summit and all inclusive training camp for professional hockey players. And this camp utilizes the same techniques from his book Intent. His born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and now resides in New York City. Justin is a coach and author, a speaker, and I would add a little bit of a data nerd to the mix and he will attest to that. Dustin is all about recovery for max performance and takes a unique stance on monitoring recovery. We chat about recovery data points, what you should start tracking and what you should stop tracking, as well as the five stages of burnout and much more.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:02] No further ado. Let's get into.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:08] You're listening to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast. Each week, we explore how to recover more efficiently from training so you can work out harder and realize your full potential. This is the Science of Sports Recovery podcast.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:36] Hey, Justin, great to have you on the podcast.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:01:39] It's awesome to be here, just thank you so much for having me on. It's awesome to be involved with people pushing the performance sector forward. And you're doing an awesome job. So thanks so much for having me.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:50] Yeah, no problem.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:01:51] So that we got a little bit of background on you on the intro, but that's more of the what you do. I like to kind of get in the mind of why you came into this space. So what about recovery and kind of the data behind it or even before we go there? I mean, what about strength and conditioning led you to where you are now?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:02:15] Yeah, for sure. So it it all started in my playing career. It was never the biggest guy, was never the strongest guy. It's never the fastest, most talented. But what allowed me to play at the level that I did and and get as far as I did and in college and my first pro contract and everything else in hockey was simply that I helped people and was able to be coached from the age of about 16 by some very great performance coaches. And they helped me fall in love with the strength and conditioning side of things. And in the science that went into it and just figuring out how I could pull out every last ounce of potential that I had, even though I wasn't, again, the most God gifted, talented player out there.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:03:06] Yeah. Cool,so you're in the pros and then obviously now you're doing more of the coaching, the how how long was your career in and the pros and what led you to the coaching side of it.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:03:17] I was just a cup of coffee and in the pros I went from my senior year signed year contract and from there we went right into the coaching space. I had an affinity for raising my sophomore year of college. I just knew that this was a space I wanted to be on my way up through the ranks to. I had a lot of high quality, great coaches that helped inspire me to want to help give back to other players. And so that's kind of where I led. And I always use myself as a guinea pig. Rachmat has guys always thought I was weird for hooking up myself to heart rate monitor. And when I was sleeping there, then when I was on the ice to hold my stuff, to put them on the GPS tracker to my fingers, look at lactate levels and all of this stuff, you know what? I can pull out every last potential myself. And as I started to do that, obviously guys like you, they try to me as we seem to do things differently, going to again, I feel so much better than I ever have in my life. And so even as a player going through my last year, my junior year of college in the NCAA, I was kind of acting as a player coach anyways. Yeah, with the with the experiments I was doing and kind of seeing where we could test the waters and kind of get that last little bit of performance.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:04:48] So. So what what was the weirdest thing you did for recovery that everybody was like, man, that's never going to work.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:04:58] I mean, it's not that they said it would never work.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:05:01] And the weirdest thing was I would actually like pee in the cup and take a look at the ketone, issue of hydration and, and everything was really going from the ice to the weight room and to help identify how much I needed to get back in. And one of the other issues were these two things. I was just I was just fascinated by it. I was absolutely, at the other thing. It was weird, is it? Guys always thought I was I would sleep with heart rate monitor and my roommate was just like, what are you doing, had roommate on the baseball team, Another one,

 

Jase Kraft: [00:05:40] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:05:42] hockey, and they just they just could not wrap your head around it. But as in a place where I am today, I guess that's all is I always knew you were weird man. Has it paid off and.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:05:54] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:05:55] Yeah I will do the same again because I'm a nerd that way. Said at the beginning, I love numbers, I love data, I love figuring out ways in which we can optimize the human experience. Yeah. From both the way you perform covers and ultimately show up mentally on a day in and day out.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:13] Yeah I can attest to the heart rate monitor. You get some weird looks.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:19] I wear a heart monitor when I run and you know, in the hot summer you're running without a shirt on and it's strapped right around a chest wear, a bra would go in.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:06:32] You get people yelling at you through the windows just random things, but. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:06:38] One year or so on that point is in the Florida summers. It's obviously the heat melting down on you.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:06:47] And we we were trying to the train station for hours upon hours, and this was coming back on you as this would have been two thousand, thirteen, fourteen. And so you have a tenma.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:03] And that tenma I goes across your back from the strap.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:08] And so I went back to the team and we were doing weighings first day of training camp. And I take my shirt off and I'm walking away from something.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:19] What did you do on Summer?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:26] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:26] It was just kind of a running joke in there. Jerry Bra, where there a brasier on this stuff.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:34] So, yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:38] That that's that was the pitfalls of science advancement, I guess.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:44] Yeah. Yeah. You're on experiment at the cost of your own reputation or whatever. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:07:52] Be the butt about the jokes.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:07:55] Yeah. The butt of jokes. One of my teammates in college, Nick Lawson, if he's listening, shout out to him. But we had a contest one summer who could get the best heart rate monitor tan line. So. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:09] Who won that one?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:10] He did because he he was dedicated enough to go to the beach and while he was just lounging around here and where his heart rate monitor so he could beat me. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:25] Cheated a little bit.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:26] Yeah. So but anyways, we're here to talk more about tan lines, so Let's get into the you know, obviously you're a data nerd when it comes to recovery.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:08:41] So over the years, what have you been like tracking and what are some things that you've tracked before that are useful again to what are kind of your main staples now?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:54] Yeah, absolutely. It's a great question.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:08:56] So there's so much data about everything from GPS to heart rate to blood pressure, to HRB, to respiration rate.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:09:06] You can go down a rabbit hole very big and between twenty 16, twenty eighteen. I went down there to the point where I was counting the coalition, the number of explosions, a game of hockey.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:09:21] The players were taking out the number of stops and starts to change directions to the average speed first before I started actually pouring over into the real world with entrepreneurs and executives. However, what you start to find is this is that you get older and dated with that. And if you look at a survey like anything, we can skew it. You can tell a story. We can tell a story with the data so that it to the point that you're looking for, it proves the point the way that you wanted to go. And that's so different because we you have so many data points that are maybe slightly correlated with our factory worker correlation coefficient.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:10:07] It doesn't matter to a certain extent if you have fifty pieces of data that you're looking at because the math turns very convoluted very quickly. And for a regular Joe or even a pro athlete, I will ask you to I'm willing to say that you cannot create perfection. You can't. Life is unpredictable. Sport is unpredictable, for that matter. Everything is unpredictable except for how you're showing up every single day. And so we had to narrow it down to some of the best ones. What I started to find really quickly was when you're going out to a place or you're going to play a hockey game or you're going into a meeting with your biggest investors, you're not going in saying, oh, I'm going to pull back a little bit so that I can be better for tomorrow or I'm going to go in and give it ninety three percent of my back to know you're going in and you're going to win.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:11:03] If you're a high performing individual, if you want to show up and you're successful and no matter what it is you're doing, you're going to win every single day. You're not going for a tie. You are going to play for the loss, you're going to win. And so that is where all bars should be left alone. Go in and do what you do and where the focus should actually be placed is in the recovery of the athlete, the recovery of the individual, the recovery of the person. And that's how you can optimize performance. It's not about being in the moment in your race. You had no. Go, go play. We've had twenty three other hours in the day or five other days in the week that we were able to prepare you for the moment that you're going in for. And that's the mentality change that I've had to get. A lot of my athletes out of my corporate clients heads around is it's not just showing up the day of the game and going and playing or you hear the old a lo of people used to talk about cartload going to cartload the night before I go run a big race. Well, that's the best way to actually have your worst performance the night before. And in all of these things that we traditionally thought we could just do the night before or the day of, and we'd be good to go or monitor ourselves in inrun or in the event it's a whole lead up to it. And how are we optimizing ourselves and what our objectives are looking at? So it really became not so much about the actual event itself, but the recovery aspect. And that is where you can make the biggest gains in the performance industry.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:42] Yeah, you bring up a good point of last data during the actual performance is better.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:50] I know from my experience, my best races, I don't wear a watch. I wasn't looking at the time.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:12:57] I was all about what my body was doing, how I perceived what it was doing and where the competitors were, you know, and eventually I just like stopped what my body was doing. Just ran for the competition. Yeah. And I and I see this and, you know, basketball players, I would imagine the hockey players or maybe the first quarter period they're going they had a lot of running to do and then they're like, oh, I'm spent, you know, but they're not focused on the now instead of the past is like, what more can you give right now in your sport, in your boardroom? You're meeting your employees rather than thinking about what's coming and what's behind you?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:13:47]  If you know being present and knowing how you can drive forward and you bring up a good point.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:13:52] One of my a couple of my players would always say this is Justin where am I today, where am I today? And used to say just go play. They forget about where you just go play.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:14:05] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:14:05] Because guess what? Our head coach is going to be looking at us and with ten minutes left of the game done by one, do you think he's going to be keeping best players off the ice?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:14:14] Not a chance, do you think coming into this season of if you're an executive and you're presenting and it's the biggest presentation that you have, but you have to get it done that you're not going to push a little bit harder to cross that line and to get it done well?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:14:30] Well, of course you are. It's a no brainer.  So why are we going to limit you or hold you back? If I want you to empty the tank, I want you to go over the level that you think you're going to go, because guess what? The moment that you've completed, I am going to work with you. I'm going to teach you how to recover super maxillary so that you can come back even better than what you just did. You are surpassing barriers and that's performance. It's going completely backwards. We focus so much on the performance. So the physical work that's being done in the weight room, in the on the field of performance, I hear this all the time from the executive point. Where should I get my heart rate when I'm going through my runs? Where should I get my heart rate when I'm doing my boot camp classes?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:15:22] Where should I get my heart rate when I'm in my spin class on my telephone and it's like work to a maximum effort to find one number and that one number is strain, I want to know if that's all I want to know is where is your strain number at? We're completed where we at and then from there that that helps us figure out what we're going to do for the rest of the day. Yeah. How much are we going to recover?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:15:46] How much sleep are we going to get? What is our routine like? What is our nighttime routine with our sleep hygiene look like? What are we doing from a supplementation standpoint? What are we doing from the morning routine standpoint?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:15:57] What do we doing from a nutritional standpoint? We increasing calories. We decreasing calories at that point for a lot of people don't matter either. It just becomes a matter of habit in terms of portion sizes and making sure we're getting the proper amount of portions of it. It becomes so simple that it's one step after the next, after the next, and it literally becomes iterative and we start to learn the processes in which maximize performance.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:16:23] Yeah. So you talked, you know, the one big metric is strain, and I would imagine there's different metrics that you track on the recovery side like how much sleep and quality and that kind of stuff, but what goes into the strain metric?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:16:44] Yeah, that's great. Great, great question.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:16:46] So strain is a metric and survived by heart rate of heart rate and the time timestep. And once we're able to understand the time, total time spent in certain heart rates with certain movement because we're tracking all the twenty four hours that you work, if you are if you are looking for peak performance, you cannot just track the hour that you're simple. So you cannot track for just the hour, two hours that you're going through your how long?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:17:16] The nighttime hours talking.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:17:21] Two hours to two minutes and thirty seven seconds.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:17:24] There we go.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:17:24] I love, I just throw that in as so why I'm saying is for that time we're not just tracking that because that would be irresponsible. We were talking off-air before they started. You went right from there to go complete your basement. Well, there's more strain completing your basement potentially. Then what's going on in that room?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:17:47] Yeah.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:17:47] And so if we do not equate that or do not bring that into the equation, we're not going to be fully recovered, guaranteed, because we're not going to take any the actions that's based off of 12 strains of 14 strains versus a 19 strain. With the rest of your day. We brought in you as a as a professional athlete, as an amateur, as a corporate athlete, whatever you want to call yourself, you are a 24 hour athlete. Has to be, there is no other way around. If you want to maximize performance, you have to be tracking everything you do in a very specific way with us.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:18:24] We know that strain, we figure that out now from a recovery standpoint and we break it into two areas, one is recovery overall and not broken into three metrics, which is HRB, resting heart rate, and sleep. And those three metrics ultimately will determine everything, because if you want to perform better and if dwindled this down to the absolute variable, do you want to perform better? If you want to lose weight, do you want to gain weight? Do you want to be happier? Do you want to be more energetic? Want to be more clear? You want to be more productive. You want to be more just a greater person to be around when you need to do?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:19:01] Sleep. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:19:02] Get better sleep. 

 

Jase Kraft: [00:19:03] Recover. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:19:04] Get better sleep.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:19:06] Hands down. Hands down. Anybody wants to make immediate and drastic changes in the way they feel every single day. Get better sleep. It is been proven time and time and time again and study.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:19:17] There was one, Harvard, there was one in Australia. There was one in London, you can pull out 50 different sleep studies. Every single one of them shows that the better you sleep, the better quality sleep you get. The more focus you have, the more hygenic your sleep is going to be. Better you're going to have, the less likely you are to get hurt, the less likely you are to get sick. The more you're the happy you are, the more control you are. All of these things because sleep is so funny. The way it works in our neurological system is our brain is responsible for every form. This release its response to the way we think, the act the way in which we interpret information and ultimately respond to that information. And so when we think about it, if you were to go and sit in or run a race outside and sweat, what's the first thing you have to do? You have to replenish your body with some kind of liquid hydrate. But yet our brain, which is responsible for so much and the only way to replenish that is to get sleep. But yet we live in the world of sleep deprived. We wonder why. We continually wonder why we continually fall short of our wonder why we are continually living in this mentally unstable world full of mental illness and depression and anxiety and all of these things within us. Now, we're not taking the actions that we're not focusing on the one percent decrease, 90 percent of the change.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:20:48] Yeah, hundred percent. When I when I work with college athletes, especially new college athletes, first thing I say is protect your sleep because it's so important they're learning something here in the new environment.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:21:02] I mean, you're in college, which is totally different from high school, living with your parents and now you're trying to learn this sport at a higher level. You have all these different stresses, like going to sleep at least nine hours. They're doing something wrong there.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:21:16] But, but you talked about three metrics, HRB rest, resting heart rate and sleep as the recovery metrics. What is a HRB?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:21:31] Because I don't think a lot of people what that is.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:21:35] Yeah, so HRV is scientifically the number one indicator of distress, subconsciously and neurologically, that the bodies. And so if you've ever looked at it, if you're watching this on video, so we do a little drawing. But if you've ever seen an EKG, you've qrs t wave, it goes like that, if you're watching, it goes beep, beep, beep, beep on the EKG machine. And she look at the hospital, watch those heart beats.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:22:04] and the qrs t wave are what we talk about one beat. And so that's the variabe we want to look at. Now, when your body is stressed, when it's strain, when there's a lot going on, both physically and mentally, it is your body's number one goal is to keep you alive. And so this beat to start to become much more polar, so they all look. And the reason that it is because there's less variability, there's less freedom for them to come and go. This is why, because we're highly neurologically our systems are like, we need to just hold up. We need to hit the pause button on all this free wheeling and we need to just make sure the heart's beating. And so the beat becomes that those waves become identical. They become much less variable. So the HIV is going to go down, your HRB level will drop. And that is a sign of fatigue sign of chronically overtrain, it's a sign of that we're not getting enough water to sign that we're not sleeping, although it's a sign that we have mental strain and stress in our life that is, again, neurologically going to hold us back us. And so that is the HRB is a measure that allows us to say, hey, you know what, something is going on that I need. Now, on the flip side, when we are well-rested, well hydrated, we're feeling good. There's not a lot of mental stress in our lives. We maybe we meditate on a regular basis. The variability of those qrs t wave is much greater there. And it's milliseconds and very, very little difference in the naked eye. But maybe one higher, maybe once lower, maybe once quicker, maybe slower. But there's going to be much more like tingle when you're just like Conor McGregor, like the shoulder, like, you know, and like just three-wheeler, very variable. And you feel good. You're not stressed out, legitimate tense. That's what the heart rate does as well.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:24:08] That's why it is so, so important when we talk about is resting heart rate, which is a measure of how low the heart rate gets. And there's a lot of things that can come into play there. This is a bit of an older metric to take and look at again, how low that heart rate we get on any given time when we're sleep. And obviously the fitter you are the lower will get, stress you are lower will get, the deeper sleep you are the lower will get, all those types of things. You're getting stronger genetic predisposition to higher, lower risk of heart rate. But in general, it's another one to look at.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:24:45] So and I know you use tech tools to measure some of these.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:24:51] So somebody is like, OK, I want to start. You've convinced me to start tracking these three metrics for recovery. How are they about go about that?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:25:02] For sure, there's a lot of different tools out there. And this is, again, why you can really go down the,a dark rabbit hole.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:25:09] When I go back to school when I was in college, I had eight different pieces of technology and I was using a polygraph test.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:25:17] I was using a Fitbit to track steps, I was using to check my level of HIV.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:25:24] I use HIV zoning tools, the heart rate, as well as resting heart rate.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:25:35] Gadgets everywhere. I had a sleep sonographer that I saw on my brain and I check brain movement like, wow, trust me.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:25:43] Yeah,

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:25:44] And so but again, what I say is you always want to be simple, simpler the better. And so that's why I love the good that will.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:25:54] I'm glad I met a while back to tested its second in terms of rescue and recovery.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:26:00] That was such a big part of it. Obviously there's a whole of expirenment heart rate strape, second to none for tracking heart and looking at the heart rate problem. But in terms of sleep with every HIV metric, nothing has been proven and it is just head and shoulders above everything else from even as it came out, the pathological, current heart rate to get all of these items just do not do justice for the weekend. As for rest recovery, of what we have to do and tell your listeners there, what I'll do is I'll send you a link where you can put show note that if they want the world to be looking for an disasters. 

 

Jase Kraft: [00:26:49] Awesome, that on the shownote and if you're Googling it or whatever, it's w h o o p folk band there.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:27:00] So now I have a question for you predominantly.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:27:05] You've been in the NHL a little space yourself, have been there in the hockey world, and now you're kind of in the executive performance world as well.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:27:19] Talk to me about the differences in stresses.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:27:23] And do you like the recovery techniques from each? Are they the same? Like if A does a runner need to recover the same way as a hockey athlete or a CEO? How are those different?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:27:39] Its, you ask a really great question and the answer is I will say the answer is yes, because at the end of the day, our body doesn't know the difference between different types of stressors. And all of those things are the stress.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:27:53] So whether it's a neurological system, a sympathetic parasympathetic nervous system, parasympathetic nervous system is that rest digest that who like after you meditate, feel that sympathetic nervous systems like fight or flight, get ready to someone punches in the face or you're ready to go.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:28:14] And so that's all anybody knows is whether you're running, whether you're playing hockey or whether you're getting ready to go into a meeting or whether you're doing your spin class on Tuesday afternoon or Wednesday morning before you go into the boardroom. It does not know the difference. And so rest and recovery in all of those facets, although it maybe a different elevated degree it's all the same.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:28:40] And the strategies that we can implement are everywhere from soft tissue as a massage to foam rolling to long form yoga to meditation to progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing affirmations, positive affirmations to enhance breathing, cold, full body, cold immersion, infrared light, some steam room again, sleep. These are just like a couple examples that are universal.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:29:10] This is, I think, the biggest fallacy that there is. We try to quote-unquote individualize things so heavily is that, oh, you're a hockey player.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:29:20] Well, you need to be in a steam room in this position at this time of day. But if you're a basketball player, you need to be in a sauna and be in this position.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:29:33] And if you're an entrepreneur, just roll out your tabs with a camera and say it's it's one of those things that why is it only specified for why do we think we need to do that?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:29:47] And a lot of times it's for a lot of the coaches out there, a lot of the the industries to try and create conditions and think that what they're doing is so different than some crazy story when in actuality, let's go back to the cycleways.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:30:01] Actually, let's go back to what the goal is, what the objective is, what the mission is to figure that out. You start to realize that every single person is a human, every single person, whether it be. 

 

Jase Kraft: [00:30:12] Sucker.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:30:15] And I mean, Elon Musk brings something back from, as far as I know, everybody to him.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:30:22] and we're all working together. And and so we all have these similarities. Now someone's going to argue, are there slightly different things that we're going to we're better modalities, based upon what you've just gone through. one hundred percent. Yeah. However, the toolbox in which you can pull from is all the same. Are some things better in certain environments. One hundred percent, if you've just done something extremely stressful, you've just run a marathon, or just done Ironman, or just completed a hockey game. We want to do something that takes a lot of that stress, anxiety and sympathetic nervous system of rah rah rah rah, always wanting to be quiet.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:31:03] Want to know what we want to relax to again, help you come out of that a little bit more effectively.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:31:10] If you've just done a workout or you're trying to get ready for one, we're going to, again, do the of things a little bit differently. And so these are all but again, the toolbox is all the same. And that, I think, is why coming over into the entrepreneurial space, the executive space, it's been such a shocker, because a lot of these modalities they've never been privy to, never even part of the. Doing cold water or they never even thought about doing a debriefing sequence or anything like that.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:31:44] So that was getting their minds around that and starting to see these realities that professional athletes have been using for so long and that it is good for them as well. I think it is.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:31:56] Yeah, 100 percent. Now, there's there's a reason I didn't name the podcast Science of Running Recovery, because I'm like, that doesn't make sense. Even though I'm a runner.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:32:09] Recovery for me is going to be the same as a hockey player, or a basketball player or football. I mean, it's all muscle recovery.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:32:18] It's all mental recovery, which you touched on that a little bit. But I want to make sure that if you're listening, you caught this because too often, especially as athletes, I think it might be a little bit reversed in the executive world. And you can correct me if I'm wrong, but as athletes, we typically think of, OK, I recover my muscles, I've got to recover my muscles. But then sometimes that becomes such a discipline that we don't relax during it.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:32:48] it becomes another part of working out and we're still in that game mode when we go to do our foam roll and our muscle recovery, where we don't think about how much focus it took to run that marathon to play our basketball game or football game.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:33:13] And we don't think about recovery in our mind the same way as our body. And I think in the executive world, it's more of a man that was a lot of meetings. Yeah. So I need to I need to just put on some meditation or something and get out of here.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:33:30] But we don't think about, hey, you know, muscle massage can also alleviate that stress. Is that what you're kind of finding too?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:33:39] You bring up a really great point, Jase. And the I can't tell you how many times I saw guys doing yoga, and just working their way through it. we're going through this gentle yoga flow, and they're we're, and just trying to hold things beyond where they should have been held or trying to go at a pace and which is just way too fast.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:33:59] And it is, it's trying to bring you back down, and again, activate the person's nervous system that's going to allow yourself to recover. Now, on the U.S. side, which is actually ironic, what you should find is that because you're so mentally fatigued, because you're so drained from long days, because you have to be on all the time, like think about this athlete has to be on for one hour and a half, two hours in a day to go and practice everything lines in the sand. They know when they need to start, when they're done. And we go through executive, and entrepreneur, there are no lines and you make the line. And so if you haven't clearly defined the lines first, it becomes very difficult because not two hours of performance of an athlete has to be turned into sometimes 10, 12, 14, 16 hours that you need to be on work as an executive, or whatever space you you're in the corporate office. Now, understanding that because you're so tired from just continually going and going, it's too easy just to throw it to the size of what later ends up being. A month later, three months later, five years later, and you look yourself, how did I get here? You're stressed out, you're anxious, you don't sleep here.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:35:19] You go home. And you're not the best version of the family. You've gained excessive amounts of weight and got high blood pressure. You're all these things are just of work. You've focused on helping you come down because recovery, you don't think about recovery. You don't think about how you are looking after your body because you're performing the 16 hours a day or eight to 12 hours a day or even 6 hours a day. You're not doing the actual implications, and work with the doing that. Yeah, Because that is still massively taxing body. Because remember what I said, the body doesn't know the difference between mental and physical stress, which is mostly the result, is the same increase cortisol levels increases already levels increase, heart rate increase, all of these things long term, chronically bad situation. And so we need to find a way to break the chain and find a way to give the body the alleviation and the recovery time that it is to able to do that. That is sleep better, sleep hygiene, recovery modalities, all of these aspects of what we do to implement them into your life so that at the end of the day, you can be the version of you when we danced in the office or whether.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:36:38] yeah, you look at your, how you view recovery, I think needs to be shared more because I think it's going to blow some people's minds, like, oh, yeah, I need to think about this almost more than what I'm doing for my workout. But I want to talk about burnout because it's a big topic, especially in the corporate world. But even in athletes.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:37:04] Yeah, there's an old saying where that I don't know if it's an old saying, but I've heard it before that the athletes that stay are stick with their sport, are the ones that make it to the pro levels, the ones that make it to these very elite levels.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:37:26] And they beat out people that are better than them because they just stick with it and other people get burnt out and they stop. And you see this in sports where all these cities and corporate and I believe it has to do with recovery. So what like what are some signs that you might be reaching to that burnt out stage?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:37:48] It's a great question. Really, really good. In the beginning that we start to find is you you literally nailed it on the head is we talk about consistency because consistency is ultimately what's going to determine whether we're successful, because at the end of the day, being consistent and being able to show up day in and day out is what determines whether you're successful in athletics or in in the business world, in the office. And I say the five big signs of burnout, five big ones, and the first one is procrastination. So literally to the point of self sabotage where we procrastinate things that typically we would I'm not going to go to the gym today or I'll do that presentation later or I'm just going to get five more minutes of sleep or I'm just going to hit the snooze button on my day or whatever it might be.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:38:52] But procrastination is definitely number one, first first sign of burnout. But if you start procrastinating, that's typically more enjoyable to you or things that were seemingly simpler that definitely for some checking is unable to focus. And a lot of people overuse this word focus. And that acronym I use, it's called Follow One Course Until Success. What this means is a lot of people are like, well, when you're in the zone. No, it's just you're following one course. You're focused on what you're doing. It all of a sudden when you get easily distracted, when you're going down one way and you all of a sudden veer off or start adding four or five things to your plate, you're just unable to focus.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:39:36] You're unable to have that clarity that allows you to move forward. It's another one of those side burnout and it's going to, it's going to actually really deteriorate your productivity, which would increase frustration to increase the type of work you do, increase your heirs. Only so unable to focus is is number two, that feeling of the feeling of being demotivated, develop a headache, not being able to feel like you're not seeing the right way. Those are all things, again, that add to that sense of burnout. You quite often hear that motivation is what causes people to act. When you talk to the inverse is actually the motivation for just doing things.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:40:22] when we're not finding any of this motivation to continue another sign of burnout and then a fourth one is you're not even taking time to fill your position, your personal needs, health care time and suggest to you things that you would have loved to do before, whether they read a book, whether it was take your dog for a walk, whether it was to sit quietly by yourself. My guess is if you are experiencing burnout, you haven't been doing those things anyways. so is the time of which you can sit and fill your soul. They don't exist. They don't happen. So again, all the things that we can keep track of and to ultimately see what's happening. But physically, the number one thing we're going to start to see is struggling with sleep.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:41:09] We're going to have a hard time falling asleep, even though we're so exhausted and tired. We're going to have to have a hard time having deep sleep because our resting heart rate isn't getting as well.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:41:19] Our heart HIV is going to be much, much lower and again, much more variable in between now. And it could be high. When I was little, we could have restless leg syndrome. Her legs continue to. Continues, which can lead you to believe I was going to go through the roof, through the roof, because, again, we're not going to wake up with a restful obviously for 10, 12 hours a night and you wake up exhausted.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:41:47] So those are the signs of burnout that I found, everything from procrastination to the ability to focus, to be motivated, not looking at yourself, doing the small personal things that you need to, and then struggling with your sleep and restlessness.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:42:06] So somebody I would imagine that once they get to that number five, it kind of just really snowballs because then they're not going in that sleep quality, which is obviously one of the pillars of recovery here. But if somebody so obviously, if you're listening to this, you're going to go get the band and start tracking your sleep. But if somebody is like, you know, it's coming now to me, but I haven't yet got it, how would I know if I had a deep sleep versus just not.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:42:39] How would you sense that?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:42:41] Yes, it's a great question. And it's to be honest, it's very hard because it becomes subjective, but a good way to do it.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:42:49] And if you're not going to go try to sleep, if you're not going to go and have some type of piece of technology and data, science tells us that we sleep in 90 minute cycles and by sleeping in the 90 minute cycle, we go through the stages of sleep like sleep slowly, slowly, sleep right to sleep.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:43:08] Now, each cycle is not 30 minutes long.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:43:11] They are not created equal. And again, it depends on the person, but likely it could be 20 minutes on your sleep. So it could be 40 minutes and then. So it could be 30 minutes.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:43:22] It really depends on on you, each person over the course of the night.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:43:27] So if you know that you need to wake up at six a.m. in the morning, on average, we need five, 90 minute cycles of sleep every single night. That's seven and a half hours of sleep. If we include those five cycles on any given night, we need to count backwards from six a.m. so that we know when we need to go to bed. And so if we counted backwards five, 90 minute cycles from 6:00 a.m., we would say, OK, now it's me at me needing to go to bed at 10:30, and that is going to give me the best quality, best chance to have the deepest sleep possible.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:44:05] Now, is that falling asleep at 10:30 or getting into bed at 10:30?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:44:10] I'm just trying to fall asleep by 10:30.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:44:12] So that was going into, this is why you sleep with me. So you need to make sure that the sleeper to you have starts. It's called a reversal and I implement that with all my clients. So the reverse alarms would go off at nine thirty and now at nine 30, you now give yourself an hour to go through the sleep routine that we would individualize and prepare for you so that ten thirty you're sleeping, it is gone. It was just a trade off. Get into that. You go through the cycles. Another strategy that people can implement, I call the seven three two one zero, which is seven hours plus of sleep every single night, the minimum three hours before you go to sleep. There's no no more food. It's simply, simply one, which is two hours before you go to sleep. There's no more work to nothing that's going to stimulate you in that way. One hour before you go to sleep, there's no more blue light emissions, no more cell phone, a computer, no TV. It's in your reading. You're meditating, talking with your significant other, whatever it may be. That and writing, journaling and then the zero. There's no hitting snooze and no time to get right up the middle and propose are really attractive if you are able to utilize that 90 minute rule, getting five out on average every single night, plus implementing three, two, one rule, I guarantee you the quality of your sleep are going to be going up exponentially every single night. You're going to start to notice the difference when you wake up.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:45:51] So I'm going to throw some curveballs at you on that and then or wrap this up, because I very respectful of your time here.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:45:57] But the three hours you said no food, no water, no food, only water.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:46:05] What about, like some sort of sports drink or like flavored water? Is that going to mess with sleep?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:46:13] That's, that's totally fine as long as there's no plastination or anything.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:46:19] Ok, and then you said no blue light an hour before I have these fancy glasses here.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:46:27] You've got the blue eyed emissions that I need now. Now, is it OK?

 

Jase Kraft: [00:46:33] If I were those and either watch TV or look and I found an hour before bed.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:46:39]  I would I would come back to say no because it's a habit we're trying to build because of the stimulation that's going to be going on. And so if we cut it out an hour before bed, because we're now going to happen, is that show that you were watching or hanging out on social media or whatever it was that you were doing, those continually stimulating the brain is no longer going to be there because reading or writing or something to that effect, having a conversation with somebody rather than watching and having to create patterns and identification within your brain is different. And so it's going to give you a different reaction.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:47:14] Ok, so it's not necessarily the blue light that's bad. It's the stimulation that. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:47:19] The blue light is definitely there too, but it's what comes with the blue light.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:47:24] Sure.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:47:24] It's computers, TVs, it's iPad. Is the tablet itself.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:47:29] Yeah. Cool. OK, cool.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:47:32] Well, this has been the very value packed. So now somebody is listening. I guarantee somebody is listening and say, man, I need more Justin in my life. Where can they connect with you?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:47:46] Yeah, absolutely. So I'm very active on social media platforms of Instagram and LinkedIn, and I'll give you my and those who support those materials as well.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:47:56] But it's @justinroeth on Instagram and linkedin it's just my first and last name Justin Roethlingshoefer. So you want to definitely find a link to that because extremely long.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:48:10] Yeah.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:48:11] And then and then the website, you book a call with me anywhere or any time that you want.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:48:18] It's justownit.co

 

Jase Kraft: [00:48:22] And then who, who should connect with you? What type of person?

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:48:26] Honestly, anybody looking to optimize the way they're showing them. Doesn't matter if you have same trainer, doesn't matter if you are not an athlete.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:48:37] You're an entrepreneur that is looking to lose weight as well as anybody who's looking to perform at a higher level, take their experience in which they're showing that day to day and feeling better, being more aware, decreased the anxiety you're feeling, decreased continually tired feeling and truly, for lack of a better word on your days.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:48:57] Yeah, and just to be clear, you do you do some, like, performance writing plans, like as far as workout plans as well as recovery plans. But if somebody has a coach, it's not like you're going to double dip there. You'd be on the recovery side. So you're going to be able to help them come to games, come to practices, come to meetings and work better closer to that one hundred percent.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:49:31] We're going to help them tap into the hands of who they are and what they can bring of their potential every single day.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:49:38] Awesome. Well, it was certainly a pleasure having you on the show, Justin, and maybe sometime in the future we'll have you back to look forward to it.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:49:47] Thank you so much for your time today.

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer: [00:49:50] All right. Episodes over. If you found value in this episode, please consider giving us a review on iTunes. And if you haven't already yet, subscribe do so now. So you don't miss any important topics in the coming week. If you have any questions or suggestions for the show, please send them my way. I am most responsive on Instagram.

 

Jase Kraft: [00:50:11] That's @jaecheese or email me directly at Jase@scienceofsportrecovery.com. Talk soon. 

 

Justin Roethlingshoefer

Recovery Specialist & Ex-Pro Hockey Player

Justin Roethlingshoefer earned a bachelor’s degree in Movement Science from Westfield State University and a master’s degree in Exercise Physiology from Louisville. He is the founder of THE HOCKEY SUMMIT, an all-inclusive training camp for professional hockey players utilizing the same techniques from his book Intent. Born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Justin now resides in New York City.

A Coach, Author, Speaker, and I would add maybe a little bit of Data Nerd in the mix, Justin is all about recovery for max performance and takes a unique stance on monitoring recovery.