March 16, 2021

21: Periodize Your Nutrition for Optimal Performance -Jenn Giles

21: Periodize Your Nutrition for Optimal Performance -Jenn Giles

Jenn has 23 years of experience working with athletes in all sports and of all ages. She sits on the USOC (United States Olympic Committee) dietitian registry and works with Olympic hopefuls, NCAA Student-Athletes, Prep School Athletes, Adult Athletes, and Youth Athletes.  Most recently Jennifer began teaching Sports Nutrition as an adjunct professor at Columbia University -her Alma Mater.

We chat about:

  • Periodization of Nutrition
  • Small Sustained Changes = Big Results
  •  Increase Your Workload by Recovering Better
  • How to Eat During Your Base Phase of Training
  • To Carbo-Load or Not to Carbo-Load
  •  How to Eat Sweets while Training
  • Our Relationship with Inflammation
  • How to Eat During Highest Volume/Intensity of Training

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Other Episodes Mentioned:

#22 With Faye Stenning

Jenn Giles:

THE SPORTS NUTRITION HUB: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sportsnutritionhub

Free Sports Nutrition Self Assessment download: https://eat4sport.mykajabi.com/pl/243137

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jenngileseat4sport/

Website: https://www.jenngilesrd.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/jenngilesrd

Jase’s Information:

Instagram: www.instagram.com/jaecheese

Website: www.scienceofsportsrecovery.com

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4cHv4ysGa6u3h22NjUkFEw 

Email: jase@scienceofsportsrecovery.com

Transcript

Jenn Giles: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Jenn Giles: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Jase Kraft:
Welcome to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast, I'm your host, Jase Kraft, and today on the show, I'm introducing you to Jenn Giles. Jen has twenty three years of experience working with athletes in all sports of all ages. She sits on the USOC United States Olympic Committee Dietician Registry and works with Olympic hopefuls, NCAA athletes, prep school athletes, adult athletes, youth athletes, you name it if you're an athlete so you can work with you. And most recently, Jennifer has begun teaching sports nutrition as an adjunct professor at Columbia University, her alma mater. Today, we're going to chat about periodization of nutrition to reflect your training schedule.

Jase Kraft:
And if you're like, what the heck is periodization? Well, keep listening, because this could truly be a game changer for you. Let's get into it.

You're listening to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast, each week we explore how to recover more efficiently from training so you can work out harder and realize your full potential. This is the Science of Sports Recovery podcast.

Jase Kraft:
Jen, welcome to the show. It's great to have you.

Jenn Giles:
Thank you. I'm so thrilled to be here.

Jase Kraft:
I want to start with just like what sports and athletics mean to you as a person, obviously having a background in athletics and now a sports nutrition. But what does like being an athlete mean to you?

Jenn Giles:
Wow, that's a great question. I think overall it means everything to me, first of all, because I think sports is a reflection of life and I think that the time and the dedication and the perseverance that it takes to be an athlete at any level, no matter what level you're at, is reflective upon your personality and you carry that over into other aspects of your life. So I really think it's kind of the foundation where we learn all the tools we need to be the best person we can be.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, when did you realize that, like sport and life, like have this huge crossover?

Jenn Giles:
I think I realized it probably in my 20s, so maybe a little bit later than most athletes, but I really kind of took it for granted until then, until I really was training for my first marathon where I figured out, wow, this takes a lot of time and dedication and I have to sacrifice a lot for this goal. And then it dawned on me like, wow, this is kind of like life.

Jenn Giles:
Yeah, it was for me. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
Well, you're not alone in that because I was right around my early 20s and I started to realize that I was like late college, just out of college and like, wow, I've learned a lot from running and going through sporting organizations and just relationships and being a leader and all that kind of stuff. So. So. So why did you then choose to go into sports nutrition as opposed to kind of a general nutritionist or dietitian or field?

Jenn Giles:
Yeah, I think it came down to that. Like in my twenties, I actually was on my path to medical school, believe it or not. And I was training for marathons and I thought if I go to medical school, this is a little bit selfish of me, but if I go to medical school, I will not have time to train for marathons.

Jenn Giles:
And it's what I love most. And then the more I got into making the connection between food and performance, I thought, you know what, I can really I figured it out. I figured out many different ways since then, but I thought I figured it out then. And now I can really help people figure this out. And I kind of knew that that was my calling, quote unquote. I switched gears and I thought if I go into this field, I know I'll always stay active, I'll always eat well, I'll always have this focus and I will have an impact on others being able to do that. So that was really my light bulb moment.

Jase Kraft:
So where do you get your start in athletics then, like, obviously the love had to come from somewhere? Was it your parents? Was it like you just the friends that were involved and stuff? Or how do you get started in sports?

Jenn Giles:
Interesting, because, I mean, youth athletics, town sports, all that kind of stuff. I was involved in soccer, basketball, swimming, softball. I kind of did it all as a young athlete, but it wasn't super passionate about it. I was kind of just doing it because everybody else did. And then high school came and I played softball and I really did love softball, but and I swam and I love swimming, but I just never was good enough to be honest, to do it in college. So I went on to college and something dawned on me in college, probably after that freshman fifteen/forty somewhere between there. And I just I, I grabbed a pair of shoes. I went to the running store, grabbed a pair of running shoes because I just you see it, people running out all the time. I thought maybe I can do that, maybe that will just get me back in shape and blah blah blah. Like I knew there was an athlete inside me somewhere. I just didn't know how to get her out any better is better, but I just couldn't make the connection. So long story short, I got the pair of running shoes. I was on vacation with my family and I went out and I ran, just ran.

Jenn Giles:
I didn't care about form speed, I, I just ran and I, I made it three quarters of a mile. I like I think I pulled a muscle in my back so nobody should pull muscle and so I had to walk home like a down and for some crazy reason I put the sneakers on again the next day and the next day and the next day and somewhere over the next, the course of the next couple of weeks, I got that runner's high and I just I love this. This is so great. And I didn't change anything about my nutrition at that point. And a couple of months into it, I thought, you know what, I'm just going to change my nutrition. I wonder if that would make me better. And so I read magazines and every article I could get my hands on and I made small changes along the way and that kind of light my fire because I started to get better. And that's when I kind of said, you know what, I really am an athlete and I'm going to I'm going to focus more on this.

Jenn Giles:
And that's the beginning of my story go.

Jase Kraft:
But your story, like I think is a similarity between a lot of people where they start to take a sport more seriously and the first thing they do is up their training. And then eventually you get to a point where like, OK, I can't train anymore because I can't recover from the training that I'm doing. So where is the next step? And then that's usually the light bulb goes off.

Jase Kraft:
It's my nutrition, like, how do I feel my body better to do better workouts and stuff. But before we get into that, just contrasting your sports nutrition before you kind of went through college, learn all this stuff to now take us to high school.

Jase Kraft:
You where were you at?

Jenn Giles:
As far as I said, I played softball and I was. My biggest sports nutrition snack on the sidelines was Cool Ranch Doritos.

Jenn Giles:
And this is good in the 80s.

Jenn Giles:
I mean, I probably haven't had them since the 80s either, but yeah, I mean, that's what we would do. And it did not even dawn on me that that was not a great sports nutrition snack. And just I don't know if it was the 80s or it was just my mindset or we didn't have the knowledge back then or what, but that's what we would do. No wonder I wasn't a great athlete. I wasn't feeling my body well at all for swim practice. We would have a hot dog truck pull up to high school right after school, before practice. And we were down hot dogs from the hot dog truck before we get in the pool. And I do I have memories of like a hot dog during some practice, which is awful. I mean, stark change. And then it's freshman year in college. It's all about pizza and beer and going to the vending machines for Snickers bars during studying for exams and whatnot. So, yeah, there was there was minimal thought on my part about food and performance.

Jenn Giles:
I just just didn't think about it at all. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
So then when you did start thinking about it, I would imagine it was that hard to find places where you could make a little adjustment.

Jenn Giles:
I think I think the world is a lot easier now to make such changes. I mean, this was in the 90s, the early 90s, where it dawned on me that I had to make some changes and there wasn't a lot of healthy options out. There wasn't places where you can get smoothies or Acai Bagels or Chop's places or just wasn't. And I was living on campus, so it was a lot of salad bars, baked potatoes, grilled chicken, you know, and I was just kind of piecing together all the information, but I didn't have a lot offered to me. So I kind of went through the motions until I was living off campus and had more control over my food intake and grocery store shopping and that I really started to put together nutrients. But much better.

Jase Kraft:
Got it.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, well, we'll get into more kind of like the ins and outs of that here, but I want to just touch on what are your training is like now? I know you do triathlons. Marathons are like, why are you kind of focused on now?

Jenn Giles:
As you know, like I said, like in my 20s, I was training for marathons, primarily road about half marathons, marathons. I would do a bunch of 10k too. And then my very end of my 20s, probably twenty eight or twenty nine, I got a little burnt out from all the running and I decided to go back to my swimsuits and hop in the pool and swim. And then I said to my husband, let's just buy bikes and start biking.

Jenn Giles:
Neither one of us bike before. And a friend said, Let's do a triathlon. We did. And the first mini-triathlon we did, we got hooked. And it was probably a little before 30. Right. And we just did them all the time, everywhere we traveled to do tri's and and really ever since then, that's been my true love. I mean, I'm a runner foundationally. I'm a runner. And it's probably the sport I'm best at and I feel most comfortable doing. Like, if you give me a choice, I go for a run. But the world of triathlon, I think, has made me a stronger runner. It's made me more well balanced. It's it's prevented a lot of injuries. I think it's just really fun. And I love it. So I'm still super passionate about triathlon.

Jase Kraft:
How like for me, Triathlon's seems one of the most time-intensive sports to train for it, because you got three of them and two of them are like non impact, so you can do them a lot.

Jase Kraft:
So how do you balance, like, training and, you know, your job, your family? How how do you.

Jenn Giles:
Some days are easier than others and it's a lot of finding and finding the little pieces of time throughout your dad or throughout your week. I mean, I've gone to so many of my kid's sports practices and just run around the field or run around the hockey rink or just things like that. I don't have enough time or it's getting up early or it's working out in the evenings. It's never real consistent, to be honest, which is probably not great.

Jenn Giles:
But I have to work out when I when when I can, whenever I can. So I was just I have my backpack of workout clothes in my car at all times, just in case I can sneak around. So it's really time because I think a lot of it depends on the distances you think the years I was training for Ironman, like a full distance triathlon, were very time consuming and definitely overwhelming to have kids and a job and all that other stuff. I think the shorter races are are manageable. It's it's consistent training every day, but it's not overwhelming.

Jase Kraft:
So once you have, like, years of training under your belt, I'm sure like the shorter distances and in my experience, like, you don't have to do this huge build-up for them.

Jase Kraft:
And it's just kind of like a stay where you are in shape and then maybe a block of training where you're like, OK, I have time in my life now to kind of focus on this. So I'm going to do that training.

Jenn Giles:
You know that so many more years you put into it, you know, you had the foundation to pull up on. So if you slack off for a couple of days or a couple of weeks, then it's still there. It's like riding a bicycle comes right back.

Jase Kraft:
Exactly, yeah, I I had, like, the biggest indicator of cumulative training that I like was kind of blown away by it myself, was so I started running really as like going into fifth grade, the summer of going into fifth grade, because my brothers, they went out for cross-country.

Jase Kraft:
I just like I'm going to do what my brothers do or whatever, you know, and kind of started running in and more of a structured form rather than just on the playground or, you know, football or whatever backyard stuff.

Jase Kraft:
So I've been really running since then to the end of college, the end of college. I was so burnt out that I just like stopped running for a while. I was running once a week. I would do long runs with my team, my alumni team at that point once a week. So I do like, you know, 18 to 20 miles a week on Saturday. I kept that up until I got through the summer to the the weather got bad. Didn't train for, like, literally no running, no cardio, nothing for three months. And then I got asked to be on a four by four in late January or February. And I was like, well, if I'm going to do a four by four, I might as well enter the mile too. And so I just entered in the slow heat and whatever ran the mile, most painful mile of my life, mind you. But I still broke five minutes. I was a for ten miler in college, but I was able to go four fifty-four without training on the heat.

Jase Kraft:
And I was just thinking like those people that were like in, in the middle of their training that I beat and I had to train for like three months. And I'm not saying that to brag I'm saying that to like twelve years of training got to the point where I could take three months, for example.

Jase Kraft:
So.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, and then coming now, I'm coming back into training for Spartan races and obstacle course races and like, I'm not starting from zero. Yeah, I know I was kind of a tangent on that, but I want to get into it.

Jase Kraft:
You had mentioned that you had kids during your training.

Jase Kraft:
You've gone through four pregnancies and now obviously four little ones as well. How did you balance training with that? With pregnancy and just the disclaimer this is a selfish question, because my wife is due in March.

Jase Kraft:
So, yeah, we're just kind of like trying to navigate how she's going to come back to running.

Jase Kraft:
She's a runner as well, Nancy. Yeah, that's that's how we met. We met in college. That's all. Both right.

Jenn Giles:
So I mean, I ran through my whole first pregnancy. I ran through my whole pregnancy. I was just I was just determined to make it through the whole pregnancy. And I did I ran up until probably the last week or two or just didn't feel so good anymore. And then I walked and I actually walked four miles the day I had her. And so I said that was great. I was just really gung ho. The other ones I scaled back a little bit. You just your body goes a little bit different or you just don't have a need. So my second and third, I probably ran up until like seven months and then I walked and then my fourth, maybe six months, and then I was about my fourth. I really swam so much more. So I just trading sports but, you know, it made me feel good and it just it was almost like I couldn't get through the day without moving because it made me feel normal. When you're pregnant, you feel very abnormal. So there's alien inside your body and you know, you're tired and you're hungry. You don't feel good, all that kind of stuff. So I just I did it to feel good. I wanted to sweat a little bit. I just wanted to feel good. If I had to run in a shower, I would feel great that we had a good day. So I just felt the need to do it. And I feel like I feel like it made my pregnancies healthier. And I want to think I make my kids healthier. Who knows if that's really true, but they need extra oxygen consumption makes you healthier. So we're going to go with that.

Jase Kraft:
So what about, like after birth? Like, well, it's kind of the timeline as far as what recovery did you need to vary from kid to kid?

Jenn Giles:
Now you come back. Another great question, because I was so worried about that, too. You know, as runners, you're like, think of it like an injury. Every time you get injured, you're like, what can I can I run through this?

Jenn Giles:
Yeah, I remember asking my mom to work and running cycling at least ten days until you get out and walk. And I was like, I'm not waiting ten days. And I think I think I did wait like six days and I can walk in like I think I took a couple steps and I was like, forget this and come back. You're just you're beat-up, your body is beat up. So after 10 or 15 days, I think I went out and just walked probably for the first couple of weeks. And then as soon as I felt ready to kind of jog, I did. But it takes a while. And that was one of the hardest times for me, especially after my first pregnancy, because I didn't understand that was going to take a while. You know, you're going from really running super slow. I think I was running like eleven-minute mile or something. So you're depressed because you're running so soon, slug. And at the same time, I would take three or four months and I was back to like the equal pace that I was before her. And I think I got better with each kid. Like, I think that after that first initial, like, oh my gosh, I'm a slug from the second one, I came back a little sooner. Third one, because you just learn. And again, I kind of had the crutch of all three sports, so I knew I can swim like from my body. Running was the last to come back. To be honest, it took the longest for my running back.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, I mean, it's impactful run I we actually just talked about this on.

Jase Kraft:
I can't remember if that podcast is going to be the one before this or the one after this, but with Faye Stenning, we talked about just how, like with every step you're putting in three times, like your body weight and the force into your foot off the and stuff. So like comparative to swimming where it's like, oh, would rather be out.

Jenn Giles:
It's very interesting thing to you that you're maybe interested in. I was actually faster after having my second baby than I was before my first baby, like my feed and that was in my early thirties. So I don't know if age has anything to do with it. But yes, my I was a better runner after having children and I don't have this argument with women all the time. Like, I think it's because you have a baby. You think I can do anything.

Jase Kraft:
Man, if I did that, I think that I was thinking, like, if you're talking about, like pain tolerance, you especially like in a sport like running, swimming, biking, it's really about your fitness level, but also then your pain tolerance level, like how how far are you willing to push your own body into this, like, pain cave, which is a phrase I stole from love, right?

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, but yeah.

Jenn Giles:
Anyway, I digress on that. I want to get it more into the nutrition part of this. So in my intro I mentioned we're talking about periodization of nutrition and training. So before we get into the weeds of what that is, can you just explain when it comes to nutrition, what is periodization that you're familiar with?

Jenn Giles:
Periodization and training? It's very similar. It's it reflects it. So it's almost like a mirror. So when we periodize, I can never say that word. Right, meaning we're building. Right. So you're training and you're building up your mileage and then you're building up your speed intervals. And you you're it's technically it's on a whole year cycle or season cycle depending on your sport. And there's different there's different phases. So there may be a strength phase, a muscular endurance phase and endurance phase, and then there's a resting place or an off-season. Nutrition always has to reflect the phases that you're in, in your training. So basically, to put it really simply is whatever you're training you're feeling has to support that. So if you're in an off season, your feeling has to reflect off season and you can't be eating the same amount of protein, carbohydrates and fats when you're not running or not training or not working out. But when you're building, then you have to feel a little bit more when you're racing, you're in a race phase. You have to feel a little bit differently. And there's different factors that the timing is different, the composition of nutrition is different, the quantities are different. So you really base it all on your training depending on what sport you're in.

Jase Kraft:
So when it comes to like endurance sports, that's where I'm most familiar with as far as like the periodization of training.

Jase Kraft:
So what kind of stick with that? And if you're in, like, involved in a team sport, just think of like when we talk about these phases, what that might look like for you, and then we can fill in the gaps from there, or you can reach out to jenn to fill in the gaps wherever we miss here.

Jase Kraft:
But so starting in like the the base phase is probably what's most commonly referred to as. But you're either coming off an off season, starting from zero. You're just really building that aerobic base from a low is low mileage or low volume to building up to where you're going to sustain throughout the season. What should your nutrition look like at that stage?

Jenn Giles:
That's actually the best age to start because that's your foundation. So you really want to focus. You're still focusing on the same types of foods, whole foods, less processed foods, minimizing sugar, minimizing saturated fat. But when you think of endurance athlete, we're earning a ton of carbohydrates. That's a first feel your body pulse from when you're in a base phase. You're not really running super long distances. You're not really doing super high interval. So you don't need the high volume of carbohydrates in during your bases. So we're really focused during that phase and on more lean proteins, more wholegrain carbohydrates and a little lesser quantities and healthy fats, because that's going to be the basis of what you're going to pull from when you start building. And I like to use that time to really focus on getting different fruits and vegetables and micronutrients in your diet, because that's going to build your muscles and all the tissues in your body that you're going to need when you do start that training and you'll be so much healthier and stronger when you do that. So Base stage is a great place to start reevaluate what you're eating, the timing of your eating, the the quality of your nutrients, and then you can kind of build on that as you go into your next phase.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, cool, so what what are your thoughts as far as like.

Jase Kraft:
You know, there's there's kind of like two schools of thought when it comes to, at least in my mind and when it comes to dieting, you're like either saying I can have everything except this or I these are the things I can have and that's what I'm going to stick with.

Jase Kraft:
Meaning like, for an example, I'm not having ice cream or I'm not having candy or not having brownies. Those would be like the nots versus, hey, I'm going to focus on fruits, vegetables, good fats, good meat, have that get full on those things. And then if I feel like it some day, supplement it with what supplements the right words. But I treat myself to ice cream or these kind of thing. What are your thoughts on just like those two different thoughts of approaching a diet from a sporting standpoint

Jenn Giles:
I think there's a huge psychological component to it. And I think that well, my first thought is we're athletes, right? And we're we're really putting a lot of energy and training and time into our sport. We're burning, to put it simply. Again, we're burning a lot of calories. So I think there is a room for those treats because I think you deserve them so much. But there's extra room for it because we're doing so much. I think the second we say I'm not going to have something, then it's like, OK, we're putting that on the forefront of our mind, OK? I'm not going to have it. Oh, God, I need it. I need it. You know, it just makes it it makes it more desirable almost to say I'm not going to have it. So I think it's healthier and I think you'll have more success if you say I'm going to have it on a day when I know I'm getting all these other nutrients in my body's good, like get up all the good stuff in first and then treat yourself to something that you really like. But on that same note, I also say pick the treats, pick the five or ten treats that you like ice cream. Is it cookies? Is it cake, is it candy, whatever it is, and stuff that you really love and that's worth it, that you're going to enjoy the most, like nibble on Swedish fish if that's not your favorite. Sweet you.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, favorite. But I also like ice cream.

Jenn Giles:
Except that, you know, you put yourself on the list and you say, I'm going to have this X number of times a week because I like it and I enjoy it. It makes me feel good. But I wouldn't do something like Neverland Ranch Doritos because they're not they don't make me feel good or whatever the food is for you. So I do prioritize the fun stuff. As long as you're getting the good stuff in first.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, cool cool.

Jase Kraft:
Ok, so based phase or more focus on healthy proteins, fats, less focused, not totally getting rid of carbohydrates because we are having that longer endurance stuff. If we get into now like phase two and phase three kind of blend together where you're talking like the initial workouts and then like your your high intensity, like phase three, you don't care about any races or performances during this time.

Jase Kraft:
It's just like how hard can work out essentially and recover from obviously. So those two phases like the ramp up period, phase two and phase three, is there a difference in nutrition? So we talk about them one at a time or I think the way you put it was great to kind of blend together.

Jenn Giles:
So nutrition reflects both of them. The only difference will be the reflection of the workouts. So then you'll take it more on a micro and look at your body and say, OK, well, Monday's my off day. So then nutrition needs to reflect your off day Tuesday. So my high intensity day. So I'm going to bump up my nutrients a Monday night going into that workout. And then since it's such an intense workout, we're going to recover Tuesday the rest of the day, Tuesday, and then all day Wednesday because we're still recovering for twenty four hours after that. And the nutrient shifts is just going to change on a micro level. But I would say, like just we'll use that as an example because Tuesdays tend to be track days for a lot of runners. Right. So and Mondays tend to be OK. So for most people on that everybody. So Monday is what I would do is, is keep it more balanced. And then Monday evening I would up your carbs a slight bit. There's no such thing as carb loading anymore, but you do want to increase some whole grain, carbohydrates or good sources of carbohydrates, maybe potatoes, Farrow Brown rice, have that with your grilled chicken or grilled salmon and some extra veggies for micronutrients so that you're having a balance.

Jenn Giles:
But I would just increase the portions a tiny bit because you're going into a hard day the next day and you need that glycogen storage. That's what that's what increasing the carbs does if you increase it, because Monday night, when you go to sleep, growth hormone is released and you're going to store all that glycogen. So when you wake up and you hit the track, you're going to have this boost of energy because you just feel your body really well. You have a great workout. You have to hydrate really well afterwards because recovery is a number one, eat some in a solid post recovery, snap right away just to replenish your muscles stores. So something with carbohydrate and protein is best chocolate milk, Greek yogurt, some granola or something like that, and then still increase your nutrients the rest of the day because you're continuing to recover that rest of the day.

Jase Kraft:
Really, when you say increase your nutrients, are you talking like micronutrients, like rich foods or nutrients just in general, like total control over the book?

Jenn Giles:
So you have your macronutrients, protein, carbs and fat. Those are the big guys. They're macro's. And then you have your micronutrients, all your vitamins and minerals. So you need both. They both work together. So the macros are like the team captains and the micros are all your teammates, but they all work together to be successful. So you got to get extra macros.

Jenn Giles:
So boost protein, carbs and good fat. These are good choices of those three and then fruits and veggies, because those are the little worker bees that are going to help the big guys lay down muscle, recover any tissues that have been damaged through that workout, because that's what we do, who damage our muscles when we work out and we need to replenish them so that they grow, become stronger.

Jase Kraft:
So you mentioned, like right after the workout and this has come a few times over podcasts, like some carbs and proteins within like an hour after the workout. Why is that so?

Jenn Giles:
I love this. And the research is mixed on this. So we used to say take it in within 15 minutes. And now the research is more like it's a range, more like 20 to 60 minutes. So it's a there's a little bit of confusion with that. But the bottom line is take something. And within that first hour, just what you said. And the reason being is when we're working out, we have blood pumping all of our body, lots of blood. Your heart rate's up and your heart is pumping blood everywhere. When you stop working out, your heart rate is still pumping. So if you eat something sooner rather than later, those nutrients are being carried through your bloodstream better and more efficiently to your muscles. The more you wait, your heart rate slows down. Their blood is getting pumped to muscles, but not as quickly. The nutrients won't get delivered as efficiently. So that's the reason behind taking that in and in. In a window of time, I usually recommend 20 to 30 minutes once you start feeling a little bit of hungry, afterwards is when you should take an extra.

Jase Kraft:
And what would that be like? So you have your hard work out and you have your cool down and then like I mean, your body doesn't work like this, like it's on a time clock or whatever, but the 20 to 30 minutes, like, are you talking after the hard workout, like 20 minutes into the cool down or like after your cool down here, then?

Jenn Giles:
That's a great question. Ever ask me that question before. That's awesome. But yes, after the entire workout, because after the hard workout you don't want to take something and then cool down your tummy will just not at all. So yes, your complete workout is done. Then you take it in.

Jase Kraft:
And what would be like the the advantages of having this is going to come across as a stupid question, but like so your body's primed to kind of.

Jase Kraft:
Distribute the nutrients where it needs to go afterwards.

Jase Kraft:
So what would be the difference of having something like a healthier choice, even if it's like peanut butter and some bread or carbohydrates and protein versus like, hey, I just worked out like I just need, you know, simple sugars, carbs, and I'm going to have a Snickers. Like, what? What would the Snickers do to the body that like a healthy.

Jenn Giles:
Great question. I love this. So you also have a lot of inflammation after you workout. So and that's great. Your body gets inflamed and then your body controls the information that actually helps build strength and endurance. So inflammation is a good thing, but we need to control it afterwards or else you can set yourself up for overtraining or injury. So that's important. So what Whole Foods do for us is they control inflammation. So having something like peanut butter that has omega-three fatty acids in it, that's going to control the inflammation, whole grains because it's going to control the information. A Snickers bar is loaded with sugar. Sugar is extremely inflammatory. So if you take something with processed sugar right after a workout, now you're exasperating that information instead of controlling it. So that's a really important point about the importance of eating something that's healthy and nourishing versus something that doesn't have any nutrients in it.

Jase Kraft:
If you stick around and listen to enough of our episodes here on The Science of Sports Recovery podcast, you'll notice a common theme of importance of mobility in recovery and injury prevention. That's why I recommend checking out the Red States Virtual Mobility Coach to help you improve your mobility, recover ability and injury prevention. The Red State is a brainchild of coach and athlete Dr. Kelly Sterrett, who you can learn more about on Episode 13. His virtual mobility coach program helps athletes understand the importance of recovery, pain relief and self care. In other words, it helps fix the recovery side of training so you can keep seeing results from your workouts. His program will guide you through the same mobilizations use on athletes in the NFL, NHL and MLB provide custom tools for pain relief to give you customized pre and post exercise mobilizations based on your training and sports schedule and deliver daily mobilizations to keep you on track to achieve your goals. You put your heart and soul into your workouts. Make sure you get the most of them by going to thereadystate.com/jaseagain.

Jase Kraft:
That's thereadystate.com/jase. The link will also be in the show notes. Now back to the show.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. And you brought up a good point that I want to just highlight, because sometimes only there's a there's a stigma. I think with inflammation like inflammation, it's bad, right? It's not bad. We just don't want like it's a stimulus.

Jase Kraft:
I think that's kind of more the right way to think about it. Like you you got done training. Now there's inflammation that's stimulates muscle regrowth and better growth or stronger muscles. But we don't want to add to that with something that's not going to stimulate muscle growth because then it's just taken away for your body's ability to repair like your muscles. But the other thing we don't want to do is think of inflammation as like the enemy, because then we start getting into like, oh, I should take ibuprofen right after I work out because, yeah, that reduces inflammation. And I don't know if, like you, you've done studies on like ibuprofen afterwards or anything, but could you just speak to like, why inflammation Isn't the enemy? And like, why ibuprofen isn't the answer to to recovery basically.

Jenn Giles:
I mean, it's like a Band-Aid. So and it can it'll control it a little bit quicker. We don't want to control that information too quickly because we want our body to work the way it needs to work. Think about like when you cut your finger papercut. Right. There's a lot of information in there when you cut it because it's a trauma to your skin and that's a good thing. That's part of the healing process. So if you cut your finger and take an ad, well, you're decreasing that inflammation right away. And it's not going to heal as properly as if you skip the Advil and maybe had salmon. Right. Omega 3s. That's the control that inflammation slower it's going to and it's also going to provide nutrients to help all those tissues work together. The same thing happens to your muscles. So we'll make you a super hard run. Say your quads are super inflamed, right? Because we just did sprints for forty five minutes. Now, if we took an ibuprofen, those quad muscles, the inflammation would be controlled within like. Forty five minutes, we really want to take something like a peanut butter sandwich and control it over the course of the next couple hours, three hours when you're metabolizing and absorbing all those nutrients. And then it can happen in a more efficient way, because now not only does it have the omega 3s, which will increase inflammation, but it also has other nutrients, B, vitamins, vitamin C, protein, fiber, which are giving the whole muscle more nutrients to recover and control inflammation. It just nutrients give your body what it needs to do its job. The best medication is there. There's a place for Advil after surgeries and stuff, but not for exercise on a consistent basis because then you're actually stopping your body's natural processes.

Jenn Giles:
And yeah. So that's the best way to explain that.

Jase Kraft:
Cool. Yeah, thanks for thanks for going down that alley with me. I want to get to the like the baseline and then in, like a real world example of how this increase should kind of look like, because it's one to that. It's one thing to say, like, yeah, increase your your carbs or fats prior or your carbs prior, then proteins, fats, carbs, everything afterwards. But then we get a question, how much. So providing like it's just an example of right around forty five minutes of like hard exertion and RPE scale of like eight or nine. Typical workout in the afternoon. What should your if you know, kind of like your baseline intake of what you typically do, how much should you increase the night prior and then leading into that morning and then aftwards

Jenn Giles:
It will be a little bit different for each athlete, just depending on what their metabolism looks like with their body weight looks like and what their goals are.

Jenn Giles:
But in general, I always recommend one to two servings extra the night before. A really hard workout just means like if you're going to have chicken, vegetables and a big potato, I would say have two chicken breasts and have maybe a one and a half baked potatoes or even two potatoes, if that's not too much food for your stomach and an extra portion of vegetables, because then it's a bigger meal. Yes. As long as you can stomach it. And the athletes, I can't stomach that much food that I don't like to eat to dinner is kind of what I would say is have two dinners, so just break it up. So maybe it's six o'clock and another half at nine o'clock or a couple of hours apart however you want to end it, because that will also help the glycogen storage. Another way of doing it is spreading the food out throughout the whole day. So Monday is your rest day, then just boosting one, serving at every meal, breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, so that your overall intake throughout the whole day is higher. That will also increase the glycogen storage, but one to two servings of vegetables, carbs, protein or carb charging fat, rather sorry, big flexible person. You now have to sit there and eat five plates of pasta the night before, I think, which is kind of an old school carb loading. Not right. We don't have to do that. In fact, that can actually slow you down instead of speed you up and also create a little bit of inflammation speaking in information. But if you're just boosting one to two servings of every food group or macronutrients, that's money enough to increase glycogen storage overnight.

Jase Kraft:
So you said it could increase inflammation. Like is that like if you if you kind of get to that point where you're just stuff beyond stuff, all you want to do is lay down on the couch and take a nap.

Jase Kraft:
Is that like at the point or just eating too much causes inflammation or anything that was.

Jenn Giles:
Eating too much refined carbohydrates.

Jenn Giles:
So if you just passed out without the fat, without the genes, that would cause inflammation just because it's too many carbohydrates, without a balance and other things.

Jase Kraft:
Got it. So it's not the quantity, it's the quality. Got it. OK, so then leading into the next morning right before the workout and then after the workout, what like the timing here is key.

Jenn Giles:
So if you're doing an afternoon workout and we're working out at 3:00. Then breakfast, so right when you wake up in the morning, you have to top off the glycogen because your blood sugars have dipped a little bit overnight because we didn't eat. So we want to top it off. So oatmeal, some chopped nuts, diced banana, something like that that has complex carbohydrates, omega three fats and some protein. And then I would tie it up to when you want to work out, almost work backwards. So if you're going to run it through your last meal, probably wants to be between 12:30 and 1:00 to give yourself a nice at least two hours to digest that. Some people need more. Some people need less. That may be a little bit individualized, but as long as that food is absorbed and digested before you hit the track and then I would back that up a little bit more. So 12:30-1:00, I would have a mid-morning snack, say, at 10:00. So you're feeding your body and times throughout the day and then you'll be good to go.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, OK. And then after the workout, we have like, ah, chocolate milk or protein bar.

Jase Kraft:
However, you want to kind of feel that after within that 60 minute window, is it as simple as that one to two extra servings, then that night you'll be hungry.

Jenn Giles:
See, this is the beauty of your body, too, is when your body needs nutrients. And it sends a signal, so it's really important to be aware of that and in tune with how you're how hungry you are after workouts and yes. And not let you go overboard.

Jenn Giles:
So sometimes we get starving and then just grab that half gallon ice cream and start eating it after our hard workout recovery snack right after.

Jenn Giles:
So we're replenishing a little bit and then maybe two hours afterwards, have a sandwich, let's say half a sandwich while you're doing workouts at three o'clock or. Yeah, you'd be ready for dinner at that point. So then you can actually go and have a full dinner as long as it's balanced with all your nutrients, your feeding, your body, what it needs, you're punching the hunger, you're helping recovery, and then you can even get the second healthy snack afterwards. So say a Greek yogurt with berries so that you're continuing to recover because you still continue to recover for twenty four hours after a hard workout.

Jase Kraft:
Mm hmm.

Jase Kraft:
So then do you just continue like the the next day, like a little extra breakfast than you normally have and then, like, back down to what your would baseline be

Jenn Giles:
, but then you just plan it based on what your next workout is.

Jenn Giles:
So do you have like a Hillary workout the next day? You may have to do the same kind of pattern. It's it gets a little complicated because as athletes, we're always either recovering from a workout or preparing for workout middle class. You're always thinking about that yesterday and the next day. And so you may just have to go back on that cycle of increasing, decreasing, increasing, decreasing every single thing, every single thing you put in your mouth needs to reflect your workouts. Training schedule.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
So I'm curious if you see this trend or if it's just something that it's crazy for me, I, I do long runs or long workouts, but more not so like long workouts, but like long run. So like two hours or at least an hour and a half to two hours.

Jase Kraft:
Whether I do them like just easy or hard, it usually takes me like the next day and then I'm just like ravaging food.

Jase Kraft:
But that day I don't know if it's like my stomach is just kind of worked up or what have you, but I'm usually not as hungry that day if I like. Should I force myself to have that extra food or is that just a signal?

Jase Kraft:
My body is telling me, hey, now I'm ready to intake the next.

Jenn Giles:
Another great question. So exercise actually has an appetite suppressant, so it's very common not to be hungry after workouts. And that's where we get into trouble because they're not taking in the fuel that we need to recover from. So while I hate to say Force-feed, because I'm a big proponent of just listening to your body hunger cues, I would just eat smaller and more frequent meals so that you can you can handle a little bit. You can handle chocolate milk or peanut butter sandwich and you don't need to have a big meal. But if you have smaller little meals every two hours for the rest of the day because you're not starving, you just need a little bit, then wait until your hunger increases. Maybe the next morning to really have a bigger, solid meal, you have to individualize it. Because if I asked you to have a big meal and you're not hungry, you're going to feel awful and you're just not going to do it and not going to help anybody, especially not your performance.

Jenn Giles:
So it's on your own body and figure out what works the best.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, well, a disclaimer here, I, I tend to kind of just listen to my body, but then I got way too skinny and like, I couldn't I couldn't eat enough to keep on the way that I needed because I literally just got bored of eating that.

Jase Kraft:
And I think that, like, unless of you're an athlete in training at a certain level like that, the term bored of eating you've never heard of it.

Jase Kraft:
But then, like, if you can relate to it and you can relate, but if you can't, you're probably like, well, I'm stupid over here.

Jenn Giles:
I mean, just like that, it suppresses our appetites.

Jenn Giles:
So sometimes I really don't. I mean, I'm in the same boat. I go out for a long while and come back and I'm like, I'm not hungry. I just know I need something. And that's, you know, you can find different things that you like that will that will satisfy your recovery and your need not to take in a lot of food.

Jenn Giles:
And in that case, maybe I'm more dense. Do you to be better for you like a handful of nuts would be great because it's loaded with nutrients and calories. But you only need a little bit and not a great point.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. Is there any way I don't know if this is the study.

Jase Kraft:
I just kind of came to my mind, like, is there a way to increase your appetite like afterwards, like anything you can do to kind of like, hey, I want to want to eat, like, how do I do the first step?

Jenn Giles:
Not that I know of, to be honest. I mean, I'm sure there's medications, but we don't wanna go down that road. No, no.

Jenn Giles:
I think the best way to increase your appetite is to kind of do what I just said. If you eat little amounts of foods every two hours, your body will get used to you taking in food two hours. And the science behind that is then if you don't, you will actually increase your hunger level. So you're teaching your body to be hungry just by timing what you're doing.

Jase Kraft:
So. Yeah, that makes sense, cool. All right, so anything else on phase three that we should be looking at as far as nutrition before we get into the championship or.

Jenn Giles:
No, I think that I think if you repeat the patterns that we just talked about and just make sure that you're increasing your intake and nutritional intake as your training is increasing, then you'll notice a difference.

Jenn Giles:
And that's the biggest thing, is you will feel better, you will run better. Your motivation will be better to eat this way because you are performing better. And that's where that connection happens. That's where the light bulb goes off and you're like, oh, wow, this is really working and that's your motivation to keep going. So and it's different for everybody. But once you figure out what works for you, then then you go with it.

Jase Kraft:
So getting into the last phase of training, when you're like, OK, my training load is coming back down because I am ready for my peak performance, like I best times the best performance, feeling the best.

Jase Kraft:
I see a lot of athletes get nutrition wrong at this point because they keep eating like they were or they slack on their nutrition because they're like, well, I'm not running as much now or what have you, or it's just like a mental break. I don't know. But what like should we be thinking about as or D loading our workouts but want to keep that maximum performance?

Jenn Giles:
So this is a really crucial thing to get right. And again and take some practice and you may do some things wrong before you get it right. So just know that. But when you're decreasing, when you start going into a taper, you're decreasing your overall volume of training and your intensity, which means your nutrients have to reflect that same kind of theory as the rest of the year. But right now, it's really crucial because you're prepping your body to do the best you possibly can. So you still want to stay away from the refined sugar because that's going to increase inflammation you wanted. And the whole decreasing in nutrients is interesting because we are hungry because we just ate a lot through your training. Right. So it's tricky and you can be hungrier. Or so hydration comes into a point here, too. Hydration and a lot of extra fiber can keep us fuller and even though we're decreasing our overall intake. So that's key. And I'll mention a little bit about hydration real quick before I get into it. Is hydration before a race is really key because we want to go into your race optimally hydrated. So you want to make sure that you're drinking enough water and taking in enough electrolytes so that you're holding on to that water before. So I would say like a week leading up to your race to do that. Hopefully your body is really prepped and you're doing a great job in hydration during training. So that doesn't feel awkward or new, but that will also help all the nutrients that you're eating do what they need to do and prep your body weight. Great. The danger that comes into not decreasing your overall intake is you can actually and you will gain weight per say, but you can actually get a little bit bloated, let's say, because you're not sweating out a lot of stuff. You're not burning a lot of carbs and you can feel a little bit sluggish and you don't want to get to the start line and feel sluggish and bloated. That's really the most important part about just minimizing that intake.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, I experienced that now that you think of it like you said it and I thought of it, that in my experience I would feel great through like the highest volume, highest intensity training because I ate a lot or at least tried to eat as much as I could.

Jase Kraft:
And then when we come down to, like, deloading for even just like a week, and we're also traveling to different places. So it's harder to keep like your natural diet that you would normally eat your eating out at different restaurants and that kind of stuff maybe that you haven't been before. I've come into the race just like or that day, just like my stomach kind of feels bloated, like you said. Not like that. I'm.

Jase Kraft:
Not I'm not heavier than I was, I just feel heavier and I feel bloated, and it sounds like it's just because I didn't want to eat things that I normally eat, which my body was reacting to.

Jase Kraft:
But I also didn't decrease the amount in accordance to what I was doing.

Jenn Giles:
And it's tricky. It's a tricky place to be in. And you're right, you feel a little bit off because we're used to doing so much now. We're not doing a lot. And your body doesn't like those extremes. So you definitely feel a little bit off during taper. So that's normal.

Jenn Giles:
But if you if you actually reflected your intake on your output, you would feel a little bit better a little bit later, a little bit less like dead leg feel, you know, because you just have. But it's tricky place to be in because you still want to store glycogen for your race, especially if it's an endurance race. So it's it's the sweet spot that you need to find where you feel good and it takes practice to do that. a little trial and error. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
At what level does a race become an endurance race, like how many minutes,

Jenn Giles:
That's a great question, because for some people, a 10K is an endurance race.

Jenn Giles:
Like it just it depends on your sprinter endurance athlete. In my mind, I really nutritionally from a nutrition perspective, I think you really need to start thinking about nutrition at the half marathon level. That's that's where you can get through a 10K. And most people can get through a 10K without worrying too much about loading up on glycogen stores and the sort of thing. Unless you're like an Olympian and racing it, then I think you really need to pay attention to it. So intensity matters. But I think the 13 mile mark is something you really need to because you're tapering, right? You take the first half marathon, you can't just go do it. Well, you probably could, but tapering. So you really need to worry about that glycogen storage issue. Marathon? Definitely. Ultra's definitely obviously a triathlon. We're all the same thing for a half. You really need to start planning it.

Jase Kraft:
Cool, cool. OK, so we're getting to the end.

Jase Kraft:
That was a great conversation topic I can talk all about.

Jase Kraft:
And I want to just quickly before we get into how people can find you, if you got a little time here to just share a story on how you seen the the periodization of a nutrition plan like an athlete that came to you and that that really, like, stuck out on here their performance before. And then we implemented this periodization and really focusing on nutrition and then they went to the next level.

Jase Kraft:
Do you have a story that kind of sticks out in your mind.

Jenn Giles:
That she and she was a triathlete, so in a pretty solid triathlon, too, but really wasn't tuning in on nutrition at all. And in fact, she didn't eat poorly, but she just didn't reflect it with their training. So she was just, you know, eating healthy, but not timing it towards a workout or not thinking about recovery just didn't really have that knowledge base. So when we tweet a couple of things and we did a lot in terms of increasing protein, she was very, very low. And her protein intake, which for women is pretty huge, too, and especially at this time, this particular triathlete I'm talking about was in her mid 30s. Thirty five, let's say, I think thirty five. And she wanted to qualify for for nationals, US nationals, and she really wanted to go to world. So what we did was we spent a full season doing exactly what we're talking about right here, periodizing thing here. And I think her serve her nutrition around her training and right off the bat and her base season. And she felt so much different because she had the energy. She was like, normally when I'm just training, I feel tired, fatigued. I want to go out for a run or ride because I'm beat. She was OK once she got started, but she never really had the motivation to get out there. And then once she started increasing her protein, then she was not only riding better and stronger, but she was recovering faster. She never had that fatigue factor the next day because as a triathlete, when you're training for the half Ironman events, you're doing long stuff every day at some points to, you know, you're doing, you know, maybe a 50 mile ride on Saturday and then doing a 13 mile run on Sunday.

Jenn Giles:
And then you're looking like you're just doing that. And she wasn't recovering. So we increased our protein and she was she was prioritizing protein at every meal and snack, which is huge. And we are increasing her carbs a little bit. I think a lot of endurance women especially now decrease their carbs because they think, you know, the diet is huge or we need to intermittent fast or whatever. They hear all these things. And it's not true. All these fad diets really aren't helping us athletically. So when she boosted that, all of a sudden our energy came back and she was like, oh, hello. Now I can run eight minute miles where I used to be slogging away at ten and her performance, like, skyrocketed. So she did. And then the other thing we really dialed in was for hydration. So she wasn't really hydrating. She did have a couple of kids. So it's hard to drink water and be in the bathroom all day when you're hydrating. So what we did was we not only increased our fluid intake, but also increased our sodium and potassium intake so that she was she was storing water in her muscles instead of having it just passed in the body. So that's an interesting thing for athletes to to get so that they're really absorbing so they're hydrated. So she went into every workout, well hydrated and well fueled, and she nailed all her workouts. Therefore, when she went into taper and raceways, she can perform top, top notch and she did me nationals'. And then the next season she made worlds. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
Wow. Very cool. That's so cool.

Jenn Giles:
Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
I think like just even the beginning of your story there was so powerful of the scene, not wanting to go out the door and get started and then to like being feeling like ready to go and get out the dark. It's like that is a sticking point for not only like your average Joe, but elite athletes too. I mean, like my senior year of college, we ended up getting fifth in the in the nation and our cross-country team. So we were an elite team.

Jase Kraft:
But man, and if my wife is listening to this one, goes out to laugh at this, but I don't know how many times I told her because we were married at the time, I said, Kiana, I'm retiring. I'm not doing this anymore in the summer.

Jase Kraft:
And then she'd see me out the door like thirty minutes later or whatever after I procrastinated a little bit. But there are so many days that I did not want to get out the door and knowing kind of my history of just under. fueling and getting to a point where it's to skinny, which probably led into burnout and some other issues that I had, if maybe if I would increase my protein intake and intake overall, I could have had a little bit different summer there.

Jenn Giles:
Yeah, but you just made me think of something else. Body composition thing is huge and even in reference to the triathlete that I was speaking about. So her fat content of her body fat and lean muscle mass content, really, I mean, it was amazing, the change. So and she was an athlete. She wasn't overweight by any means. But when we when we did change our nutritional composition, her body composition changed. So not only was she feeling better, but she was physiologically stronger because she had so much extra lean muscle mass and less fat mass. So that has to do with links between energy, too. So a lot of the reasons we say, oh, it's time to go for a run. Well, I think I just had another cup of coffee and do it in an hour or two hours and all of a sudden it's four o'clock in the afternoon and then you're drudgeing getting out there because you have to and you don't feel good. And so body composition is huge. You're reflected with nutrition, which is reflected in your energy levels connected. We're all different puzzle pieces.

Jase Kraft:
Awesome. Wow. We could sit here and talk for hours, but maybe just have you back on it and sometime in the future, but let's get into where where can people connect with you if they need more Jenn in their lives? You do have Instagram and your handle is.

Jenn Giles:
@eatforsport is my Instagram handle. But I'm also on tick tock, Twitter, LinkedIn, Jenn Giles or Jenn Giles eat for sport. I also have a great Facebook group which I have athletes, coaches and parents of athletes. And that would be it's so great. It's I have a great group of people in there. We answer questions, we talk about fun facts, we do meal prep ideas and it's a great community. And that's called the sports nutrition hub. So more than welcome to hop in there and grab. It's a free group and we have a lot of fun.

Jase Kraft:
So, yeah, and I'll have links to to all that in the show notes as well.

Jase Kraft:
And I know we were talking before, you have like this self-assessment for when it comes for athletes, when it comes to sports nutrition. Could you briefly talk on that and where an athlete could go to find that is.

Jenn Giles:
Yeah. Yeah. So it's a thing I use with a lot of my athletes when I work for them. When I work with. Self-assess themselves, and it's a checklist you go through and you say, I do this activity sometimes, always never, and it really opens up your eyes to what you need to work on first. So works on your weaknesses. And I have created a self-assessment for everyone to share. It's for free. Just download it. And I'm inviting everybody to go grab that too. And it's a great thing to do and really sit down and look at what you're doing well and what you're not doing not so well. And then those are things you can work on first.

Jenn Giles:
And where do they I'll send you the link for that. That's like a website link. That means that you guys can. OK, sounds good.

Jenn Giles:
So if you're driving or if you're doing the dishes or whatever. Go look in the show notes for all the good stuff there. Jen, thanks so much for so much for having me.

Jase Kraft:
All right. Episode's over. If you found value in this episode, please consider giving us a review on iTunes. And if you haven't already yet, subscribe do so now. So you don't miss any important topics in the coming week. If you have any questions or suggestions for the show, please send them my way. I am most responsive on Instagram.

Jase Kraft:
That's @JaeCheese. JAE. Cheese.

Jase Kraft:
Like the food or email me directly at jase@ScienceofSportsRecovery.com Talk Soon

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Jenn Giles

Registered Dietitian

Jennifer has 23 years of experience working with athletes in all sports and of all ages. She thrives on helping athletes achieve their goals!

Jennifer also has myriad of consulting experience from corporate wellness (GE, Pfizer, Meryl Lynch, Alan and Co.), to Clinical Hospital(Greenwich Hospital, Stamford Hospital, Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, LIJ-North Shore), Community Fitness (YMCA, and personal training facilities). Jennifer works with all athletes of all levels and abilities. She sits on the USOC (United States Olympic Committee) dietitian registry and works with olympic hopefuls, NCAA Student-Athletes, Prep School Athletes, Adult Athletes and Youth Athletes. Jennifer also writes for publications, speaks to teams, and consults with schools and recreation facilities. She is an author, and a freelance writer and also a faculty member of MySportsRD.com.

Most recently Jennifer began teaching Sports Nutrition as an adjunct Professor at Columbia University -her Alma Mater.

Jennifer’s background is unique in that she was a youth athlete (swimmer and softball player) turned adult athlete (runner, open water swimmer and triathlete) who married an athlete (runner and triathlete) and is now the mother of four little athletes (Swimmers, hockey players and lacrosse players). In other words she knows the expectations of all moving parts for athletics - coaches, parents, sports organizations as well as athletes’ own expectations.