March 23, 2021

#22 How to Balance Entrepreneurship & Training with Faye Stenning

#22 How to Balance Entrepreneurship & Training with Faye Stenning

Faye quickly became a dangerous threat to obstacle course racers around the world. In 2014 she placed 12th at the Spartan World Championship. The last three years Faye has been focused on her ultimate goal of being crowned the World Champion.

In 2016 Faye had a big year; she was signed on the Spartan Pro Team, finished 2nd in the US Spartan Championship Series, 3rd at the Spartan World Championship and managed to hold the number one spot in the global world ranking throughout 2016.

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Faye Stenning:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/grit_coaching/

https://www.instagram.com/fayestenning_ocr

Website: https://www.gritcoaching.net/

Jase’s Information:

Instagram: www.instagram.com/jaecheese

Website: www.scienceofsportsrecovery.com

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4cHv4ysGa6u3h22NjUkFEw 

Email: jase@scienceofsportsrecovery.com

Transcript

Final Audio.mp3: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Final Audio.mp3: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Jase Kraft:
Welcome to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast, I'm your host Jase Kraft, and today I'm chatting with one of the best in the world when it comes to obstacle course racing. In fact, she was ranked number one in the world in 2016 and has a top three finish at the Spartan World Championships, all while being entrepreneur and coaching others and their journey of running and OCR. I'm very excited to get into this conversation.

Jase Kraft:
You're listening to the Science of Sports Recovery podcast. Each week we explore how to recover more efficiently from training so you can work out harder and realize your full potential. This is the Science of Sports Recovery podcast.

Jase Kraft:
Hey, it's great to have you on the show.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, thank you for having me.

Jase Kraft:
So I want to start with just like your overall view on athletics and sports, because I know it's obviously important to you and your life being professional athletes. So, like, when did that love start?

Jase Kraft:
Was it always there or was it something that you like? I'm just good at this and let's keep doing it.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, I was like totally like forced into sports at a young age, I had like severe EDB and I was just like bad.

Faye Stenning:
And my parents were like, we got to, like, put this girl into something to, like, get rid of some of her energy and so she can sit in class and, like, focus. Yeah. So and then I just like I was like pretty instantly, like I had my gym teacher, like, tell my parents, like she like can run. We would do this like warm up jogs before our gym class was like a lap around the school with like six hundred meters. And like I just like instantly was like, wow, I'm going to run the six hundred meters as fast as I can. Like I just was so competitive like yes. All the boys. So they kind of like my gym teacher, like literally like called my parents and we're like this girl's like like. And then I just sort of stayed in track because I was like I was like the first thing I was good at was still about all these other sports. I was so bad at school and I was kind of going down a path like not maybe not so much a good path. And what all these friends that were trying to get into drinking and drugs and did it at it and I could have easily seen myself swing that way because everyone knows me. I love to have a good time. So like sports, I kind of put me on this, like, straight arrow path. And then my hope became to try to get into school, into an American school and get a scholarship. So, I mean, I hate to say, like, sports saved me, but my life would have been so different if it wasn't for that gym teacher, like, really seeing talent me and putting me down this path.

Jase Kraft:
So what about, like, sports kept you from going down that path just because you had practice in the morning and you couldn't stay out? Or did you get introduced to a new group of people or what was going on?

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, like both of those things kind of nailed it in the head there like it was I was so competitive that I just I cared so much about beating people and winning and doing my best. So, yeah, I was like, I got it. I was smart enough to know that I got to eat healthy. I got to go to bed early. Alcohol's not good for you. Staying up late is not good for you. And so and then because I was just kind of like involved in this, I went from like the party friends to like the like no offense, but they're kind of dorky cross-country team. Pretty quick. My whole friends circle changed. And, you know, that's where I met.

Faye Stenning:
I became close friends with my current business partner. And I just I just turned into like a different person. I just I loved I loved that I was finally good at something. I think I kind of it was hard, like struggling in school.

Faye Stenning:
And I had, like, reading problems like I could. I was like reading comprehension was hard, but I just felt so like I can't do anything. And then all of a sudden I'm just like kicking everyone's ass on the track and felt so good. I just got addicted to to winning and the praise that I was getting from it. And I just I that's all I cared about at that point across country.

Jase Kraft:
So can be pretty durky, you know, so dark, so well.

Jase Kraft:
When you when you started into that crowd then, was it kind of a culture shift or shock for you then? It's like you were hanging out with these other kids or were young enough at that point where you're just kind of in both for a while.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, no, I, I kind of just shifted over my parents and specifically like my mom was like. They were so like, look, you want to go to university, like your grades aren't that good, like you're good at this, like get a scholarship, like they really like I didn't have a choice. I needed to be good. Like, my mom was like she would, like, highlight on the heat sheet before a track meet, like all the girls that, like, had times that were like a little faster. I mean, these are the girls you're going for. And I just felt I did feel a lot of pressure to perform and I just didn't have a choice. Like it was like I was getting picked up by my mom after school. Every single day I get driven to the track and like I was just on this regimented routine. I was I was even swimming at one point in the mornings at like five thirty five in the morning. We had to be on the swim deck. So I was just I don't know how I did it. Like I was way busier then than I am now and I'm really busy now. I just was this robot and I think that's where I developed this this work ethic and. Yeah, but I mean, I think I mean, I have to give it a bit to my parents, like they really knew what to say to freak me out.

Faye Stenning:
And I was like, oh shit, I got too smart. And yeah.

Jase Kraft:
So at that point, like with, with the pressure and your parents really pushing you, was it something that you still liked and worried or doing, or was it like you were just doing it because your parents said you had to and you're like, this is the only way I can get to college?

Faye Stenning:
No, like I liked it until I started not doing as well as I thought, like I was on a trajectory to make the Olympics like in twenty eight, like I like. And as I got older and what I mean by that is like the times that I ran when I was like 15, 16, 17, like I was kind of like they were incredible. Like I was, I mean I was first in the country for a bit until Jessica O'Connel, my business partner, showed up. And then all of a sudden she started beating me and I was like bumped down. But I was that was kind of the path. I remember having a conversation with my track coach, like and he told my parents, like, she really could make the Olympics. But then as I got into university, a whole rack of distractions, you know, came into that scene. And I just wanted to do everything. Like I just wanted to be the life of the party. I wanted to do well at track. I still found school challenging. So I think I had to work twice as hard as everyone to get like seventy five percent. And so then I started to hate it just because I wasn't doing I wasn't the star anymore and university that I was in high school. And then I just started to just I started to get really, really angry because I saw times that I couldn't run in university, that I could easily run in high school. And that's kind of what really put me off the sport for a while. It still does put me off the sport like I'm in New York. People are crazy about running. They're like, hey, why don't you run this race or run this race?

Faye Stenning:
I was like, no, they're like, why? I'm like, I don't want to see the same time that I ran when I was fifteen 16. Now I'm thirty one and I run that same time like I totally have plateaued in my running. And luckily it's a high enough threshold that I still can win races with that speed that I had when I was a child. But yeah, now I totally get that.

Jase Kraft:
I mean, I in my college career, I got to the four ten mile threshold and then I never got faster in my last three years of college. And that was rough. I mean, you get to that point where, like, I just want a part.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. Yeah, I just want to be are you doing all this work?

Faye Stenning:
And I know I know it's tough. It's tough. And like some people, I think just have like like a critical speed that they got peak that this is like as fast as their their body can go for numerous reasons, like, you know, like everything.

Faye Stenning:
Everyone has a peaking speed and you hit it when you're fifteen or you hit it when you're forty, it's you hit it. So yeah.

Jase Kraft:
Do you think because you mentioned when you went to college you were involved in a lot and going to parties and that kind of stuff. And when I, I see like the number one thing or people don't improve in college is because there's so many distractions and they try to do too much outside of running. Yeah. Do you think that you could have improved if you were able to stay focused on just kind of that same regimen as you did in high school? Or do you think that that was your path no matter what?

Faye Stenning:
Oh, no, I definitely think I could it could have improved. And and that's, I think just like a question about like life in general. It's like you could be good at really anything if you pour every ounce of energy into that and like, let the rest of your life fall apart and just focus on that one thing. But at the end of the day, it's like, is it really worth the wait? Are you really getting a return on investment from focusing on that one thing? And I think a lot of times, like the answer is no, I don't think I would have proved enough to have made the Olympics like Jessica did. I think I always would have fallen short on that. So, I mean, and you can't take away those experiences. I mean, that I'm in New York City right now.

Faye Stenning:
And the guy that I met that I moved here for was the what was the bartender actually the bar manager at our university bar.

Faye Stenning:
So, like, you know, because I was out at the bar, I fell in love. I met this amazing guy. I moved to New York City like I would never take back that experience. And that wouldn't have happened if I was just in bed at eight p.m. every night thinking about my temple run the next. Yeah.

Faye Stenning:
So, yeah, I like the way I did it, but definitely yeah. I definitely say I probably cost me a good I would say I don't know, twenty seconds in the two mile range looking at that and I totally just made that number up. But yeah.

Jase Kraft:
No that's a good point. I mean there's obviously a balance with athletics because your sport can consume you, but you have to have a life outside of that. Otherwise then your moods are totally just like dictated by the workout or the race or how your season's going. And I know you being an entrepreneur like this, you have kind of. Two competitions, because business is kind of a competition, then you have your competition there and we'll talk a little bit more how you balance all that. But let's get into your OCR career. So you kind of went through college. What did you like or did well, discover for one like the Spartan races that you're so good at now?

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, I remember one of my ex boyfriends, he really wanted to run one of these obstacle races and he knew I was a good runner. And I think it was just like we were new dating. We kind of wanted to find something that we could do together. And he was a really healthy guy and so was really important to him that we just didn't drink our faces off on weekends. So he made us enter this race. It was in Bregier. So race in Canada was a Spartan race. And like I we probably knowing me, we probably decided to like, brought it together and then I probably took off because that's just what I do. And I ended up winning by like 20 minutes or something like outrageous. And I was like, wow, like I was getting all this praise, but it was so easy for me to win that I was like, this is stupid. I was like, there are not there's no real athletes here. Like, this is just silly. Yeah, but then what happened is I found out that there is like these bigger races in the states and so me and him like went to Vegas or something, and I ended up coming fifth. And I was like, but but I was like in the mix of the top three and then probably felt the spirit or something. And so then I got like a lot of people, like the guy who ran the program at the time was like, oh my God, you're so good. You know that there's pros. And I met Rose Whetsel, a bear don't know Matt Novakovich and Rose Whetsel. They're like the OG's of Spartan Racing. I met them and they were like, you know, we make money doing this. And I mean, I just thought they were like crazy.

Faye Stenning:
But, yeah, I was so mad about that fifth place and I just came back and just started beating all those big name girls. And then I eventually got signed on the pro team in twenty sixteen.

Jase Kraft:
So did you have any wins then. Be like in big events in twenty fifteen. Or was most of your career then started in twenty sixteen.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah. Most of like I was like I think in twenty fourteen or twenty fifteen.

Faye Stenning:
I was placing top 10 Outworld at night, there's something like I was up there, but nothing like that. Twenty six. Fifteen was like the year I was like third at Worlds and like second in this series.

Faye Stenning:
So, yeah, things really kicked off in twenty sixteen. And then from that twenty sixteen year I had gotten like all these crazy contracts, like bigger contracts that I think than anyone has like to this day. I had like from third party sponsors actually made enough money like through all those contracts that I actually like, I had a great job and oil and gas in Calgary actually could be making like pretty much the same money, just putting together all these little deals.

Faye Stenning:
And I actually quit my job. And then here we are. Yeah, but I started a business.

Faye Stenning:
So it was it's funny how things like change your life like a couple of deals and you're able to take a larger risk. And because you took that larger risk, you're you find yourself your life just taking it totally different. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
So for sure, why do you think you were able to secure some of those bigger contracts when others couldn't or didn't?

Faye Stenning:
Because I'm someone who I'm always like.

Faye Stenning:
I always ask for things even if, like I always am, just like I might as well ask, like might as well like put yourself out there and see what happens.

Faye Stenning:
And like I do, like I come from like my sister is like a genius. She's like an attorney in California. And like she was like, look at these contracts. And she kind of like, you know, negotiated them for me and oh, nice.

Faye Stenning:
Looks pretty bad ass. So she got like she got like a few more dollars for those contracts.

Faye Stenning:
And yeah, I guess I was just I mean, I don't know, I still don't know why those companies sign those contracts. It seems like a lot of money like they definitely I don't think we're getting a return on investment on their potential.

Faye Stenning:
Sponsors are listening to this podcast. It's like it's funny.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah. I think this a combination of like, good, good results. I think from like a fairly marketable person. And I've just got, like, the right people in my life from the business side of things to help me out. I'm the kind of person that like, I'm just very resourceful. I always like I like a team behind everything I do. And I just, like, know who to call for. What, like that. People like to help me out.

Jase Kraft:
So let's talk about, like from your career. Twenty sixteen to now kind of hitting the highlights. Twenty sixteen. You were ranked at one point No. One in the world. When when was that like how did you get that ranking and then how'd you do that world that year.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah. So it was like Lindsey and I all year in the championship series, very similar to how it's Lindsey and Nicole right now. Yeah I was, I was still working full time and I just would I mean, I would train twice a day, either in the morning or after work or at lunch hour after work in the morning at lunch hour, just depending on meetings and stuff with work.

Faye Stenning:
And I was just like uber efficient with my time, like I would have my bucket, like, because the one event that destroyed me in previous years was like the but the carries like I was I just wasn't strong, like I was like a runner. And then like the only thing I would do in the weight room was like stuff to make my arms look good. So I feel like I just like having load like heavy load like on my like on my trunk like hearing it or our spine loaded and all that was like just not comfortable for me. So anyways, I honestly like it was I was smart enough to realize, like I can do everything except for the carries. So I would at the lunch hour I'm at my office. I used to go and I used to walk up hill on. On the treadmill with this bucket, and it was so embarrassing because, like I mean, then moments later I'm like in a suit and like at a meeting with engineers and we just see you at the gym with that bucket, like, what's the bucket? And it was embarrassing, but I just was so determined to like everyone that I just, like, did these silly things. And then and. Yeah, and so I just I just trained around working hours like a lot of people do, and I just sort of made it happen. I must say, like, I'm so glad that I have more flexibility with my job that I do now because it's tough. Like it's if you want to be really good at the sport, if you have a full time job like a traditional where you're in an office and it's it's it's a challenge for sure.

Jase Kraft:
So from twenty sixteen to now, what are your top three athletic accomplishments that you're most proud of?

Faye Stenning:
I would say, like I would say like overall, just like consistency, like from twenty sixteen to now I've placed I've alternated 2nd, 5th, 2nd, 5th, 2nd, 5th in the US Championship Series. I've been forth that North Americans like twice. I've been Third World Championship. So I wouldn't say like I've had any races that are like I've won like a huge race, you know. But I've always been like I can consistently say, like I'm like top four in the world and that and over so many years. So I think I'm I'm most proud of just that.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. And for anybody listening, it doesn't know, like what the US series is. It's a series of five races.

Jase Kraft:
Correct. Are six five five races throughout the year that varying distances, all Spartan races and then you get points for placing in there and then they add up at the end is what you place there. So that consistency is definitely like something that all athletes strive to.

Jase Kraft:
How are you able to stay so consistent, I mean, without getting hurt or getting injured? Because that's like the biggest key is consistent training, consistent results.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, I mean, that's exactly it is. It's injury prevention.

Faye Stenning:
It is like the reason that Nicole wasn't beating me before she started beating me was because she'd had this hip injury. You know, the other reason, like Rebecca hasn't been in the series, even though she plays second at World, is because of injuries. Like it's it's just it's like I always say, it's like a war of attrition, the sport.

Faye Stenning:
And I'm just like, really, really bulletproof. And I think it's because I do very smart strength training. If you need help, you guys to contact me, a great coach. I got that. No, but I, I think I don't definitely don't think it's all that. But I do think I have like a good team in terms of like Jessica. And I think we're we're very smart. We know what we're doing with training. And I just think I'm I'm like a really strong runner. I've also I'm genetically obviously like I have some genetic gifts when it comes to running. So I guess my body is made to run. Even if you just look at the way my hips and legs are designed, it I look I look like a runner. And so I think there's some genetics in it. But I also think it's just proper training. I see a lot of people over training in this sport and I do occasionally over train. But every year I like that incident of overtraining is less and less because I've learned from it. So, yeah, I think I think injury prevention for consistency, you've got to stay healthy to train consistency. You gotta train consistent to race consistent.

Jase Kraft:
So, yeah, and a lot of injury prevention comes in the weight room with the strength training portion of it I believe. So like what do you obviously you coach other athletes too. But how do you how do you approach strength training from like with the injury prevention in mind.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, like I think like a big thing is like understanding that you not only need to be strong, but you need to know how to turn on your muscles as well.

Faye Stenning:
So the activation exercises versus strength exercises, those are like two different things. And you see so many runners are like doing all this can work in activation exercises, but they don't like lift heavy weights. And then you see so many gym rats lift heavy weights, but then they're not activating. And you just you need to you need to have both of those in your strength program.

Faye Stenning:
And you just really need to look at the running stride and break it down and then specifically break down the portions of a running gate and work those specific movements in isolation under load, maybe on an unstable surface or balancing or in some way that's going to challenge your stability so that when you strike the ground, you're stable and you're strong and you can strike the ground over and over and over and over for 70 miles a week, over and over and over and not head, because you've developed a strong enough body to be able to withstand that load. And I think what people don't understand is like running is is very impactful. Like, I think when you're I could be wrong. Don't quote me on these stats. But I think when you're jogging at you're producing three times, you're three times force of your body weight. And when you turn into that a sprint, it's nine times your body weight, of course, going into the ground. So if you if you just think about that, like you need to be strong. Well, yes. Not raw, raw strength, but you need to be traveling. I always like to call it more durability and durability comes having some degree of strength. And the heavier you are, the stronger you need to be.

Faye Stenning:
You know, you see, like people always say, well, so-and-so doesn't do that much strength training. Well, she's eighty pounds.

Faye Stenning:
If I could play so she could say, you know, it's different when you're an adult, a full grown adult, you know.

Faye Stenning:
So yeah. Really important.

Jase Kraft:
You mentioned the difference between activation exercises and then like loaded exercises. I think loaded is kind of self explanatory. Heavy weights, heavy lifting, but activation. Could you give us audio visual of what that might look like?

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, so so basically the sort of overall theme and in running injury free is you really need your glutes to be working and people support both their glutes all the time. And specific. I mean, I think mostly like the glute meat is one that really sometimes just does not turn on. So the whole point of activation exercises are to isolate that muscle and kind of get it working so that the idea is if you're doing if you are doing this before you go up for a run, it's like your waking your glutes up and then when you then go for a runner, then go to your left, they're already turned on that they're able to do they're awake, they're turned on and they'll actually be able to do so. That what you're asking it to do by using those muscles, instead of relying on the other muscles, hamstrings, quads, calves to do the work. And those muscles aren't designed to do that amount of work. Basically, your glutes, the biggest muscle, it's the most powerful muscle. So it makes sense that you just give all the work to it, let it do that, and your other muscles should be supporting it. But most people have it the other way. A lot of people have it the other way around. That's why you hear people say, oh, they're quad dominant. What they're really saying is they don't know how to turn on their glutes because no one is naturally going to be quite dominant. No, naturally, we're not designed to use the most powerful parts of our body to propel us forward.

Jase Kraft:
So activation before you lift or before you run, how like how do you turn on the lights to do it?

Faye Stenning:
Like I like. And this is like where you really need to play around. And I would encourage everyone is going to everyone's going to go to strength coach or go to Cairo or whatever and get activation glute activation exercises. And there's so many different ones. But some of them aren't going to work for people just because of the way maybe your hips are, the way your body is positioned or or just the way where everyone's just different. So I think, like, go through all those exercises, find out which ones you feel a burn in your glute and just focus on those ones because those ones are working best for you. So for me, the one that I get like a really good quick burn and it turns on my glutes really rapidly is just lateral bandbox.

Faye Stenning:
So it's like a mini bounce around my knees and around my ankles. And those work really well. Clamshells like people always do clamshells. I cannot find my glute in a clamshell, so I don't do that exercise. So sure. Yeah, it's. All kind of very individual.

Jase Kraft:
Mm hmm. So you're trying to isolate the muscle and really get a little burn in it to say, like, OK, it's OK.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, yeah. Pretty much go.

Jase Kraft:
So I know. I know in preparation for this interview, I listened to many of your other interviews, and you had mentioned in one briefly that you used to be a runner, that Strads didn't do any mobility until one day you started a mobility kind of program and you noticed a big difference. Do you remember when that was and how that kind of came about?

Faye Stenning:
Yeah. It's like I feel like I haven't been doing that much mobility my whole career because I haven't really seen my lack of not doing mobility, like really impede my ability to train or my ability to race. Well, but I had like to like one race where it was like that eight foot box and like, I pulled myself up, but I couldn't get my leg over because my hip was so tight that I didn't have, like, the fluidity or the range of motion or my hips were just so locked up that I couldn't swing my leg over and actually failed that obstacle. That along with like having like getting no rapped at High Rocks for not being able to get to 90 degrees. All balls like those were two instances.

Faye Stenning:
I was like, oh my God. Like, OK, it's obvious that my lack of mobility is like really messing up with my training, with my with my races. And to be honest, like I mean, I've put in mobility for the last couple of years of my training, but it's been really, really inconsistent. I've been doing it very consistently now just because the world is shut down and I have a bit more time, but it's always the first thing to go. And I feel really guilty about saying this, but it is. And I do find that now that I have a bit more time, I have been doing yoga twice a week and I would never have time to do yoga twice a week. Like add that on to my train and onto my business and onto my social life. It's just like, no, it's not going to work. But now that things are slower, I do feel way, way better. And the one thing I've really noticed is when I get up in the morning, my feet don't hurt. My feet used to hurt so, so much.

Faye Stenning:
And I think it's just because I like your arches or just the bottoms, they would just like my whole foot would be so sore.

Faye Stenning:
And I think just from doing a bit of mobility, I've just sort of lose should lose everything in my body. And somehow that sort of trickled its way down to like having healthier, like less restor feet. So, yeah, it does make a difference. I mean, I haven't raced with like I feel really healthy and mobile right now and I haven't really had a chance to race with this new body of mind. But yeah, a date like daily activities of living, like I feel a huge difference. Like I used to have such sore shoulders that if I was like driving a car and reach back to the back seat, I'd have to like, can you pass me this? Like, I couldn't even rotate my arm and my thoracic spine was so locked up. So I just feel more comfortable in general. But I mean, it's definitely got to got to translate to better performance. Is racing to better.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
And I am not blaming you for mobility being the first to go because it's always the first to go for me too, because it's like it's, it's the extra like five percent.

Jase Kraft:
Right. You're ninety five percent is your strength and you're running and then anything else you get in is like the icing on top. And so you're stuck in between meetings or you have a busy life. And yeah, it's like I got ten minutes of this. No thank you.

Faye Stenning:
And I know totally out of it.

Jase Kraft:
So let's talk about like tapering your approach to a big race. And I know like with the Spartan series, you have multiple races throughout the year that are relatively a big deal.

Jase Kraft:
So how do you go about structuring some time to freshen up and feel good for those big races?

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, I love tapering so much just because I can actually have time to wake up and have a cup of coffee and not be so rushed like, I don't know, people say they don't like tapering. I'm like, I love tapering. There's a lot of things I actually like to do other than working out that like I get a chance to do when I'm tapering. So, yeah, I we did a podcast on tapering actually yesterday and I was saying, yes, I was like, I make a taper list. She's like what the hell are you talking about. I'm like, yeah, like a taper to do this.

Faye Stenning:
Like all this stuff that I wanted to do that I never have time to do in regular life. I get a week of tapering. So I think for me, like tapering, like obviously it's going to make your legs feel fresher. But for me it's more of just like the mental it it basically I think that like just I think running is so hard, like mentally I think it hurts so much and like I think.

Faye Stenning:
People don't understand that, like us pros, like we're just as much pain as you like, it's not like running, it's easier.

Faye Stenning:
You just get faster and it still hurts you just try to faster or even faster and faster and longer. And then it really starts to hurt even more. It's very painful.

Faye Stenning:
And you're constantly pushing yourself every day, whether that's in the long run or whether that's trying to hit peson intervals. And that takes like a lot of mental grit and toughness. And if you don't like the taper, for me, it's like I get a week or 10 days to, like, not feel that intense pain. And so then I like I like hold on to that. And I start to crave it because I've been without it. And then I kind of kind of unleash it on race day. So I find the more I taper, the tougher I am on race day because I'm not it's not just like, OK, we're going to the well again, OK, we're putting ourself in pain again. It's like, oh my God, I haven't been uncomfortable for ten days.

Faye Stenning:
Like, I'm kind of craving a little discomfort. Yeah. So for me it's more about saving up the ability to really, really push in a race.

Jase Kraft:
If you stick around and listen to enough of our episodes here on The Science of Sports Recovery podcast, you'll notice a common theme of importance of mobility in recovery and injury prevention. That's why I recommend checking out The Ready States Virtual Mobility Coach to help you improve your mobility, recoverability and injury prevention. The Red State is a brainchild of coach and athlete Dr. Kelly Starrett, who you can learn more about on Episode 13. His Virtual Mobility Coach program helps athletes understand the importance of recovery, pain relief and self care. In other words, it helps fix the recovery side of training so you can keep seeing results from your workouts. His program will guide you through the same mobilizations use on athletes in the NFL, NHL and MLB provide custom tools for pain relief to give you customized pre and post exercise mobilizations based on your training and sports schedule and deliver daily mobilizations to keep you on track to achieve your goals. You put your heart and soul into your workouts. Make sure you get the most of them by going to the red state dot com Jase again, that's the red state dot com slash j a. S e. The link will also be in the show notes. Now back to the show.

Jase Kraft:
That makes sense that I think I would argue that as you get more and more advanced in your athletic career, the pain gets worse because you're able to navigate through the pain or you're like, oh, this hurts.

Jase Kraft:
I'm slowing down. And now you're like, oh, this hurts. But, you know, everybody else is keep going. So I have to do so.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, exactly. Exactly, exactly.

Faye Stenning:
I know running hurts so much. It's so funny to me that I still do it like every time. It probably happens once a week and in the middle of an interval.

Faye Stenning:
And I'm like. I hate my life like right at this moment, like I hate my life.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah,

Faye Stenning:
Like I get back to my apartment after, like, a cool bout and I'm like, oh, my God, that was so amazing in that interval. Like, I pushed through and that really powered up that hill and then the cool down. I ran into so-and-so in the park and we had a chat. And I just feel so happy because I'm so tired that maybe I should take a nap or breakfast before I know.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, I call that amnesia.

Jase Kraft:
I forgot how horrible it was because at the end you have all your endorphins and it was like, oh, that was the best thing ever. But in the middle of it you're like, this is the worst thing ever.

Faye Stenning:
I know. I know. It's so funny.

Jase Kraft:
Cool, cool So you are the owner of great coaching. First of all, how long have you and Jasso, who we interviewed two weeks ago on the podcast, how long have you guys been partners in coaching?

Faye Stenning:
We started the business in twenty. Seventeen. Yeah. So I guess like I said, what is that. Three, four years. Three and a half. At least a half. Yeah. Wow. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
High five. So how do you balance being an athlete and entrepreneur. Is that different than when you were an athlete and an employee.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, because when I was an athlete and an employee, I didn't really care about my performance at work because, like, no one was really checking it, I just had to show up to do some shit. Like for 30, I would just leave and I would forget about work. And that was how my job was.

Faye Stenning:
So it wasn't it was actually easier in a weird way, because I didn't have this, like, deep passion for it and I didn't care about it. Now, with being a business owner and now with working with so many athletes that I actually really care about, there's pressure like on both ends. But I just think I think, like, you've got to let go of, like being a perfectionist, like being a perfectionist on both of those things.

Faye Stenning:
It's like I'm not always going to get back to my athletes in twenty four hours. Like sometimes I'm going to be late on an email. I'm like, I'm not always going to get exactly ten miles in that I had all my training thing because sometimes work comes up and I'm eight and whatever. So I think just like letting go of, like being OK with just it being OK with being like enough is enough and letting go of like even just things like I'm never going to my apartment is never going to be clean, my bed's not going to be made, I just don't have that much time in a day to do those things. And just being OK with like not being like, oh my life's a mess because I can't do everything exactly perfectly as I had planned or just like I made it. Eighty percent is is where I am. Because, you know, you're just doing so many different things. I just sort of say letting go is like is like really important. You try to do a fairly high level. A couple of things. Yeah. Yeah. And I think just there's a lot of opportunities for efficiencies that every day I'm finding out a quicker way to do something. And that's that's important as well.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. Do you are there certain things that you have to prioritize otherwise, like they don't get done when it comes to recovery for from your work?

Jase Kraft:
Because obviously if you're working at a high level, there's I mean, you can't get by on four hours of sleep for too long. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
So are there any things like sleep or recovery practices that you prioritize throughout your life?

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, like, yeah, I always prioritize. Sleep is like so important. Like that's the number one recovery tool is sleep. So I put that like first and foremost. And that's like honestly like the only really recovery thing that I like really religious about is like sleep. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
So how does your sleep routine then. Like when it's like that every same time wake up same time or.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah. It's been a lot easier now because like, like I said, I like to have a good time and like sometimes like when restaurants and bars are open like that kind of slide. So right now it's been really easy.

Faye Stenning:
But I am having difficulty sleeping now and I don't know why. I think it's because, like, I'm in my apartment so much that, like, my body's like confused. It's like, shouldn't we be out about doing things? And maybe I'm not as tired because I'm just like in this apartment all day.

Faye Stenning:
But no, I just like I mean, I have like a certain, like, sleep routine, like I like to turn off the TV. I turn off my phone so I don't have all this like light. And I try and remove myself from, like, stressful situations. So I try not to open my email or even open Instagram. And I try and have like one to two glasses of wine to help me sleep. But I won't have less than that. I won't have more than that, because in my sleep I do the melatonin, I do the CBD, I've got the blackout shades. I like have my blue blocking glasses. Like, I just it's like a struggle to turn my mind off. I have this weird, like, obsession that, like, I'll sleep and I'll have all these ideas in my head and I have a pad of paper and I'll write them down beside my bed, like in the middle of the night and I'll wake up in the morning. And I have like a huge list of my ideas and like seventy five percent of them are just so stupid. Like, yeah, that's what's keeping me like it would be like text back so and so to set up this. And I'm like, why would that be keeping me up. Like that's a dream. Like so I'm still trying to figure out like how to turn off my brain at night and I haven't really figured that out. But sleep is so important, that's for sure. The Journal at all. I yeah, I do a little bit, not so much lately, I've just been like busy and I feel like I've like nothing to journal about the way the world is like another day, like working on my computer, running in the park like nothing happened.

Faye Stenning:
Great.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
Well, what I typically find for me is like if I have my to do list for tomorrow done, you know, the night prior, then I can sleep a lot better because then I'm not worried about like, oh, I do have to text so-and-so or whatever, but no, I totally get your like. I think I have my best ideas at night right before I go to bed, and I'm like, oh, that's a good idea. And then you're like trying to expand on it and then you write it down. And then in the morning you're like, that was a stupid idea.

Faye Stenning:
Like I said, why did you do this during the day? Like, you're like, yeah, I don't know why. I like brains that come alive at night. Um, yeah, I get it.

Jase Kraft:
So. So what like who is coaching for. What are you guys about or what are you up to.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, so initially, like, we were like, OK, we're going to help a bunch of racers out, so naturally because of like I guess who I am, we had a whole bunch of obstacle racers and now we have about two runners because obviously I'm partnered with Psycho Runner.

Faye Stenning:
But yeah, now, like I mean, we're thinking about it like I mean, it would be good for anyone because I really think that, like an obstacle racer, like how they train is just like a holistic training program for like anyone, even if they don't race like you do a little bit of cardio, you do a little bit of strength, you do some skill work like you do some athletic movements, like anyone that wants to be better at obstacle racing, better just running better at like cross training for even a different sport, like in the off season, whether they play soccer and they're just looking to stay in shape in the off season. But also just for people that like because it's such a well balanced program, like being an obstacle racer and training for it, it's a great just for general fitness and for weight loss and for just I mean, really anyone. Yeah. So we don't have any like you need to be you definitely don't need to be a racer to sign up for coaching. You just need to want to train in a way that's like it's kind of like backed up by science. Like I would say like you want to train like someone who wants to be a proficient runner, but also like strong enough to be able to, like, squat their body weight and like do some pushups and do some pull ups. Like it is like training, like an athlete will always give you the best results even if you're not going to perform and and race. I think so. Go a lot of a lot of the stuff in the gym, like it's like so the opposite of how it athlete moves like. Yeah.

Faye Stenning:
Like, I mean all those machines like I think they're great for like rehab and all that stuff. I see so many people like on the leg extension machine. I'm like, what is the point here. Like I mean I guess like you're working your quad but like you can work your quadrant so much more of a dynamic way that actually looks like a way a human is supposed to move.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, it's totally high.

Jase Kraft:
When I got out of college, I was like, OK, I have the cardio, but I was kind of sick of cardio.

Jase Kraft:
And what actually got me into obstacle course racing was just the way you were able to train is like totally, oh, I can be actually strong on top and like have cardio and then like be good at a sport.

Jase Kraft:
Like, that's kind of cool.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
Like because I saw when I got that training I could do like ten push ups and I saw for a week. And you say this, but what triggered like this isn't OK was I saw this little video on social media of this dad like lifting his child up on the wall to like in the child was dressed in a Spider-Man suit and he was like like he was scaling the wall, like Spider-Man or whatever.

Jase Kraft:
I was like, well, someday I want to be able to, like, lift my kid and do more than ten push, as you know. So I was like, yeah, I should probably start doing some sort of strength. And then I was like, well, that's going to hurt running. But then it's like, well, let's do a different sport.

Faye Stenning:
So that's exactly. Exactly, exactly. No, that's why it's so. Yeah, that's why I love the sport so much, because you get to be a well-rounded athlete for sure. Like in running like.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, you're right. Like if you strike training everybody too much and running it'll slow you down.

Faye Stenning:
Like I don't think Jessica, like I don't think Jessica's ever done bench press in her life, like she would be terrified of doing that because it's like that you put on like some you're growing some larger muscles is definitely a slower down like it. Just so I don't miss that about running.

Faye Stenning:
It was just so. It was just such like this specific, like very you could go outside these lines and it was it was challenging because there's just it just limits your way that you can move and do things. So, yeah, cool.

Jase Kraft:
Because I have some questions here from the audience. I throw out an email and be like, OK, I'm interviewing faced and in the face standing. What do you want to know if I'm there and stuff? So we have a couple of specific questions for you that two minutes or less to answer. But the first one is like, how do you train for trail races in a city like New York?

Faye Stenning:
Yeah. So when I first moved here, that was like my biggest concern. So I would like take the subway like an hour, an hour and a half each way, then go run trails and then take the subway back. And that was like, OK, but it just it got to a point like it was just, again, taking over my whole day and I was having to work late at night and then I wasn't sleeping that much. And I just realized, like, I'm just not going to have access to trails.

Faye Stenning:
I'm going to have to work around this. I don't have the time to be able to commute every day to them. So, yeah, I just looked I broke down like, OK, what is it about trail racing that's different from being on the road? Well, the elevation for one point. So, OK, how does that change the way you need to what you need to do in the gym or running? And it's like, well, you just need to be a little bit stronger because there is more of a muscular demand when you're running uphill than running on a flat road. So I just like started becoming like obsessed with like doing a whole bunch of variations of lunges and step ups and pushing the sled actually, like I found, is like the one thing that actually feels like a hill sprint. Like if you are loaded up a sled and pushes it, it feels like depending if if it's a really long hill, you're getting ready for like Tahoe climb on top of that mountain. You just like load it up and like push it really slow and heavy for minutes and minutes. But if it's like you're just looking up how power you could do short spunky pushes. But I basically just made hills in the weight room instead of using a hill. I just slowed but made sure that I was always doing single leg movements that looked as similar as I could to powering up a hill. And the bike became my friend, too.

Faye Stenning:
And then, yeah, like the only really thing that is. And then you just get.

Faye Stenning:
And you just get so fit enough on the road that it just transfers to the trails because you have so much speed, the road speed is going to transfer to the trail speed. So I just focused on I always think, like I always say, like speed kills. So if you can just get your raw speed up, then you can beat the majority of people. But the area that I am still losing tons of time to is is the technical.

Jase Kraft:
Sure.

Faye Stenning:
And and so my only solution to that is like I just cross my fingers and pray that the races, they're not going to put us through the woods and through the bushwhacking and through all that junky crap. And they've actually gotten better as the years have gone on. They haven't been using such such technical terrain because I think a lot of people are rolling ankles and having crazy injuries because a lot of people don't know how to move through that stuff unless you practice it. And a lot of cities.

Jase Kraft:
So stop, stop using your tracks. You come to like, oh, crap. Like basically walk through this.

Faye Stenning:
Totally.

Faye Stenning:
And I'll be completely honest, I have been puzzled for years by how to train that in a gym. And I've tried everything from single leg hops to kind of work on reactant time and bounciness. I've tried different patterns on those like ladders, like those agility ladders to work on the can coordinate our feet, agility with your feet and just moving faster and throwing your your mind like left here, right here. Two hops here, one hop here just to sort of train that movement. And nothing has everything's just a waste of time. Like nothing has translated to the trails except for being on the trails. So yeah, it's just my thing. I'm just never going to that's going to be just always a weakness because I can't work on it. So. Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
So OK. So next question from the audience is how do you get better at suffering? You're kind of you're known as the grinder. So how do you get into that mindset to just go out there and suffer first?

Faye Stenning:
I think you've got to practice it in like training. I think that's the number one thing, is that you've got to practice like doing some hard workouts and like pushing through them just so that when it happens in a race, you're like, I I'm not shocked. Your system isn't like, what is this discomfort? You're like, oh yeah. I was here ten days ago when I was doing five by a mile and completely blew up at mile three and just sucked it up and hung on for the last two repeats. Like at some point I was actually just talking to my girlfriend about this this morning when we are running. She was telling me a story about like she's like a good runner, like two fifty marathoner. And she was saying, like telling me about like, oh, like last year.

Faye Stenning:
She's trying to go to the get the Olympic trials qualifier. So anyway, she was telling me that this one race, that race that she was trying to get at, she completely blew up. And she didn't think she was gonna be able to finish the race, but she, like, pushed through. She was completely miserable, like on the verge of dropping out, like puking. Like, just just everything was a mess. Right. And she says after that point, she's just got like a lot stronger, like everything. She became like tougher. And I think that that's almost like what you have to do. I think a lot of people haven't actually hit, like, their critical pain tolerance because they've never pushed themself that hard. But the people that have gone out and completely shit the bed in a race are gone out too hard and like really mentally struggled to get through that finish line.

Faye Stenning:
Like after that experience, you kind of realize, like, OK, that's the worst. That is that's the worst that you can. That's the worst thing that's going to happen in a race. If you were to be able to suffer through it and endure it like you, you shouldn't be so afraid of the discomfort, like people are so afraid of the pain. And I get nervous for races like not really because of placement, because like I'm just like, oh, I don't want to feel this uncomfortable and I get nervous for the pain and that's like I'm used to it. So I think that people just in some sense need to just go out there one day, hammer the crap out of the uncomfortable, push through it, and then work back from there, realize like it's not so bad, you'll be OK and it's totally trainable. So you work on it like that's that's why I work on it on my temple runs. I hate temple runs, but I'm always like, oh, this is like this is what this is kind of mental toughness training.

Jase Kraft:
I love temple runs, but I hate like temple runs broken up by obstacles.

Jase Kraft:
So.

Faye Stenning:
Like a race?

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. Like a race. So I have especially like pull ups.

Jase Kraft:
So like I have this half mile loop that'll do by my house. It'll be a half mile, come back, do ten pull ups, then go right back out and like running after doing 10 pull ups is miserable because your arms are like. Don't they don't expect to be like 10 or 12 times and you say yak, yak, yak, yak, cool, and if you're listening, you want more information on the suffering.

Jase Kraft:
I actually interviewed Hun's Olympic rower back in Episode 12. You can go check that out. We talked about entering the pain caves, is what he called it. Yeah.

Faye Stenning:
Oh, one thing I will say about that is like. You have to and I was out with my girlfriend through Tempo Run last Monday, and I was just like she was like starting to suffer. And I was just like, you got to just zone out at some point. Like, you got to, like, disconnect like your body and like what you're actually doing, like so many times, like why people stop running.

Faye Stenning:
It's like a protective mechanism. Like it's like, oh yeah, of course your body wants to stop running. Like you're literally producing like lactic acid, like your heart rate is higher than it probably should be. Like your body is like, let's stop, let's slow down. So if you can just shut your eyes. I literally told her I was like, turn off your brain zone out. If you can just just go somewhere where you're like almost like a little bit unconscious and just get it done. One foot in front of the other. That's so much better than analyzing. And people, I think, to have a mistake because they love watching, they're watching all the stats and they're just like eek out and analyze.

Faye Stenning:
Like, you don't want to know what your body's doing. Good. So just don't look at that watch and just like, go for it.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, totally. Yeah. I had this conversation with some someone a mentor in the mile like for the mile race. Like there's so many like you can go out slow, you can go out fast and just kind of depends on what crowd you're running in. But at the end of the day, I told him, like, you're not racing the clock, you're racing. Yeah. Yeah. So, like, why pay attention to your first four hundred split, your first eight hundred split. Right. Because everybody else went through the same thing. It's like you're like the only thing you're going to do by listening to that is freak yourself out because he ran too fast or freak yourself out because you're too slow.

Faye Stenning:
Right. Right, right, right. And that's so true. And like people who are highly competitive, I think, just have naturally a higher pain tolerance because they're like so unwilling, like even if they're not fit enough, like, I like I got call Hunter out on this. I don't think hunters ever been, like, fit enough to compete against, like Ryan Atkins and Robert Kelly, just from pure running standpoint. Yeah, but I think that guy can put himself in more pain, discomfort than them. And I think it's just because, like, he can't lose like he has so competitive like there if he's like in shape to run, like, you know, maybe he's just too cheap to run like a thirty four minute target. He'll run a thirty two minute 10k that day because if that's what's required of him to win, he has to win because he's that crazy and competitive and then he'll just do it.

Faye Stenning:
And sometimes I feel like I can, I can pull something out of my ass that's like nowhere near the fitness level that I am just because I'm kind of reckless and like I'll just like go out with the leaders totally.

Faye Stenning:
Sometimes, you know, that doesn't serve me well, but I'm like, whatever. Is there really any other way to race? It's like you're teared up. Yeah.

Faye Stenning:
Or like I'd rather do that a blow up than like have one of those places which like a lot of I work with my athletes a lot of times not have these races where the where you see like people like the last half mile, they're like sprinting in, it's like they're fast. This is like a half mile. And then they're like, finish.

Faye Stenning:
And I like I think I could have went a little harder. I was like, I've never said that in my life.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah.

Jase Kraft:
The only time that happens for me is if I'm winning. Yeah, yeah. If the last half mile is because I'm out sprinting somebody else for the win and I just sat there the whole time.

Faye Stenning:
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Jase Kraft:
But yeah we could talk about suffering all day. And that last question here from the audience.

Jase Kraft:
I know we need to wrap up here, but million dollar smile. You were on that show. The Canadian crusher I believe was your name. How well is your experience there? They're just curious to know a little bit behind the scenes on.

Faye Stenning:
Oh yeah. It was awesome. It was like what we were filming in Hollywood. We felt like late at night, like in the dark.

Faye Stenning:
It was like we know what it was.

Faye Stenning:
It was like we kind of knew the obstacles. Like it was a lot of learning, new skills, like on the fly. I was scared because, like, I did trust the auto fleet. So I had to work with, like, the ballet guys, like they had to pull me aside and like I got like put in the corner basically.

Faye Stenning:
And they're like and act like jump off a ladder and like just get used to, like, touching me.

Faye Stenning:
Like there's a lot of fear element. Like I'm just like I'm like, who are these, where are the engineers. Like is everything safe, who's safety tested this.

Faye Stenning:
Where is your like I was like psycho about all the realize like I'm just like I'm like just not really. I had fun with the whole TV experience and I would definitely do it again. But, yeah, it was just it was my I don't know really what to say about it other than it was like a total blast. We all bonded like the group that they had at that. Pausa defenders, the ten of us, we had a complete blast. And then the people that they brought on the show, it was crazy to see I mean, not to toot our own horns, but it was crazy to see, like, how good of shape, like we actually are, like to give someone a two minute head start in a mile.

Faye Stenning:
And then I'm like catching them like that quickly, like within a half mile and a half mile. It's like, oh wow. I'm like a fantastic athlete. But yet if you and I, we would have had like an elite level, like if we would have had kept Jogi on and he could have chased us all down too. So it's all it's all relative.

Faye Stenning:
But it was really evident there's just different levels of fitness for sure.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. I found it fascinating how they talk up the runner like he owns this gym or what have you, like, been training for this.

Jase Kraft:
And then they you know, I forget how they said go, but they go and then you see they're running for it and you're like, oh, you're going.

Faye Stenning:
I know now there's so many people are gym fit, like so many people at gym fit. And it doesn't like trends like that. Well, to like sports.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah. Or they go out way too fast and you're like you're dead after the second obstacle.

Faye Stenning:
So funny, like all this pandemic, like all the gym guys, like obviously in New York City, couldn't go to the gym. So I started seeing all of them come out to Central Park and there's this one hill. It's about 400 meter hill. So it's up incline. So it takes about 90 seconds. If you're sprinting it to the top at all, the gym guys like big puffy guys will come out and they would be on this hill roughing it out during the pandemic. And I just looked at them and I was like, ninety seconds for you guys. Is like is like a five miles for me. Like you can not all out sprint 90 seconds and they would just tie up in like twenty seconds because they are just they look like the same bolt they've got like those like hands that are like razors and they're like powering like.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah.

Faye Stenning:
And it was so funny to watch.

Faye Stenning:
I was like that guy I know he goes to the gym and I know he does like ten sets of like ten second sprints on the treadmill and then goes, there's a bunch of bench press and like you're in for a treat when you hit that 90 second, like that's going to rock you.

Faye Stenning:
Just so funny to watch that.

Jase Kraft:
So so any any inklings of the second season, a million dollar mile or so?

Faye Stenning:
I don't think so. Yeah, we haven't heard anything from them. So I don't think the ratings did that well, which is so sad because I had so much fun.

Faye Stenning:
I would totally do it again. But no, my TV days are maybe over.

Jase Kraft:
Sure

Faye Stenning:
I got asked to do this one. It was like this show that's coming out. It's like a mix between American Ninja Warrior and Big Brother.

Faye Stenning:
So yeah, I'm like waiting for them to set up an interview with me because I'm like, oh, that kind of sounds so cool because I don't know, I was like, kind of fun.

Jase Kraft:
Yeah, it sounds like I fit your personality. Yeah. So it's fun.

Jase Kraft:
So. All right, well, if you need more Faye Stenning in your life, be sure to check her out on Instagram. It's Faye Stenning Underscore OCR. You can also check out her business at gret, underscore coaching and website gret coaching dot net.

Jase Kraft:
Faye any last words that you have for the audience or what where you want them to connect with you.

Faye Stenning:
No. Yeah. No, no, no. No for further things, it was nice chatting with you and yeah. You guys have any training questions. Like Easiest Way is just to go to our great coaching Instagram page and happy to help you guys out.

Faye Stenning:
We're we're still taking a few more clients as well.

Faye Stenning:
So that's Spartan race is just around the corner in Florida. It might be too late to get us ready for that, but I'm happy to help in any way.

Faye Stenning:
So.

Jase Kraft:
Cool, awesome, we'll have all the links in the show. So go check those those out. But Faye is great having you on. Yeah. Thank you to.

Jase Kraft:
All right. Episodes over. Have you found value in this episode? Please consider giving us a review on iTunes and if you haven't already yet, subscribe do so now. So you don't miss any important topics in the coming week. If you have any questions or suggestions for the show, please send them my way. I am most responsive on Instagram. That's at Jase. Cheese Jay E. Cheese like the food or email me directly at Jase Jayce at Science of Sports Recovery that time tocsin.

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Faye Stenning

Athlete, Coach

Faye began competitive running in junior high school when her gym teacher convinced her to join a track club. It wasn’t long before she was lapping the boys and soon became one of the top junior-aged distance runners in the country. However, the early success, pressure, and Faye’s relentless ability to outwork everyone finally caught up with her. By the middle of high school she had suffered a few overuse injuries and the dreaded puberty finally showed it face. What followed was a few years of chasing times which once came effortlessly, but she was determined to push on and see what she was made of.

Faye ran on the University of Calgary’s track and cross country teams and began her career as a personal trainer following graduation. She shared her love of fitness with a diverse clientele while inspiring anyone she encountered to live healthier and fitter lives. Faye brought her knowledge and experience together and began training her clients (and herself) with a heavy emphasis on strength training and metabolic circuits. It was this type of training that not only took her clients to new levels but would serve her well in her next athletic endeavor, obstacle course racing.

With a strong aerobic base and having built some serious strength, Faye quickly became a dangerous threat to obstacle course racers around the world. In 2014 she placed 12th at the Spartan World Championship. The last three years Faye has been focused on her ultimate goal of being crowned the World Champion.

In 2016 Faye had a big year; she was signed on the Spartan Pro Team, finished 2nd in the US Spartan Championship Series, 3rd at the Spartan World Championship and managed to hold the number one spot in the global world ranking throughout 2016.

Aside from being totally addicted to pushing her body to the limit, what keeps Faye coming back year after year is the OCR community. Nothing makes her happier than getting to travel and share her love of fitness and adventure with so many positive and inspiring people. She truly lives the “work hard play hard” mantra to the fullest.